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A map provided by the Minnesota Department of Transportation shows the Minnesota 60 detour that utilizes Nobles County roads 35, 5 and 4.

Business as usual despite MN 60 detour

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News Worthington,Minnesota 56187
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Business as usual despite MN 60 detour
Worthington Minnesota 300 11th Street / P.O. Box 639 56187

WORTHINGTON -- Detours are now routing motorists off Minnesota 60 around the outskirts of Worthington, but the Minnesota Department of Transportation reminds local residents that businesses located on the highway headed south are still open for business.


"People think they can't get to businesses like Worthington Ag Parts, Schaap Sanitation and Dyke's Auto Salvage," said Rebecca Arndt, MnDOT public information officer. "They can, but that has to be their destination. You can't go on a closed road unless that's your destination. But we do maintain access to local businesses, and we will try to throughout the entire project."

Customers of those businesses should access the highway at the closest point to the businesses.

"This is Phase 1 of the contract, and for Phase 2, it will change again," said Poncho White, MnDOT business liaison for the Minnesota 60 project. "Right now, 60 is open out to Paul Avenue. It's open for business use ... but no through traffic."

The detour takes motorists around Worthington utilizing Nobles County roads 35, 5 and 4. Local drivers should be aware that a new stop sign has been located at one of the key junctions of the detour.

"Highway 35 and 5 is a four-way stop now," said White. "It never was before. The east-west traffic of 35 used to drive right through there -- now it's a four way stop. People who live out that way ... are so used to driving that way to work and need to be aware of that."

MnDOT crews are working on getting signage out, White said, but the construction and detour areas will continue to change throughout the construction process, so drivers should be alert to any possible changes.

"When a road is closed, it is illegal to travel on it," said Arndt. "It's a misdemeanor violation (punishable) with a $1,000 fine or 90 days in jail.

"It's all about keeping the traveling public safe," she added. "Everything is based off of that."

Beth Rickers
Beth Rickers is the veteran in the newspaper staff with 25 years as the Daily Globe's Features Editor. Interests include cooking, traveling and beer tasting and making with her home-brewing husband, Bryan. She writes an Area Voices blog called Lagniappe, which is a Creole term that means "a little something extra." It can be found at  
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