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Brian Korthals/Daily Globe Lavish Designs owner Amanda McTigue holds some of her homemade goat milk products which launched her downtown Luverne business.

Lavish Designs now open in Luverne

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LUVERNE -- What began as a way to help ease her daughter's skin disorder has turned into a full-time business for Amanda McTigue of Luverne.

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On March 1, she opened Lavish Designs at 210 E. Main St., in downtown Luverne, featuring an array of homemade goat milk products, from lotions and soaps to body wash and sprays.

McTigue has a herd of about a dozen goats on the farm, and decided since she was already going through the work of making products her daughter could use to help treat her eczema, there were probably other people around who could use the products as well.

McTigue purchased her first goats a couple of years ago, and began marketing her goat milk product at farmer's markets and vendor fairs last year. The Luverne native has a degree in business, and decided it was time to put those skills to work with a store front on Main Street.

Her venture into goat milk products began with making goat milk soaps, which are also available at Lavish Designs, and then expanded into hand lotions, body wash, scented sprays and body butter. She even makes her own shampoo and conditioner from goat milk.

"We've had a huge response," said McTigue of the goat milk products. "A lot of people come in with skin issues."

The lotions, soaps and body washes are available in 38 different scents, and she has essential oils available as well, along with a "Man Soap" labeled product for the guys of the household.

There's so much more to this shop than just scented treats for your skin, however.

Through her experiences at vendor fairs and craft shows, McTigue forged friendships with several women from the tri-state area who have consigned space in the store. Right now, she has 14 people who have their products available for sale, with the potential for more to be added.

The consigned items range from hand-crocheted doilies from the small to the table size, hand-tied fleece blankets and pillows, crocheted baby hats and rompers, hair accessories and handmade tutus for little girls, scarves, matching mother-daughter aprons, purses, hats, homemade jewelry and cherry pit pillows.

There are also diaper cakes and diaper trikes, which are crafted by McTigue.

Some vendor products are also available at Lavish Designs, including Egyptian cotton sheets, jeans, Just Jewelry, Infinity scarves, Christian home décor and a line of organic coffee and teas.

"I will be eventually looking for more women's and men's items," she said. "Also, I can do baby gift baskets and goat milk product gift baskets for any budget."

In the back of the store, McTigue also offers a party room that is available to rent out for gatherings. The room will be used for a Vault Denim Party at 6 p.m. Friday; and for a Jamboree Nails event from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday.

Lavish Designs is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, with extended hours to 7 p.m. on Thursday.

The shop is also open from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturdays. Look for the store on Facebook, listed as Lavish Designs.

Daily Globe Reporter Julie Buntjer may be reached at 376-7330.

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Julie Buntjer
Julie Buntjer joined the Daily Globe newsroom in December 2003, after working more than nine years for weekly newspapers. A native of Worthington and graduate of Worthington High School, then-Worthington Community College and South Dakota State University, she has a bachelor's degree in agriculture journalism. At the Daily Globe, Julie covers the agricultural beat, as well as Nobles County government, watersheds, community news and feature stories. In her spare time, she enjoys needlework (cross-stitch and hardanger embroidery), reading, travel, fishing and spending time with family. Find more of her stories of farm life, family and various other tidbits at www.farmbleat.areavoices.com.
(507) 376-7330
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