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Letter: Abortion data should spark outrage

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The brutal and horrific school shooting in Connecticut where 26 people were killed has outraged the public and our nations leaders to such an extent that, in 2013, we may see legislation regarding gun control that has never been thought possible.

Businesses have stopped selling guns. The Los Angeles Police Department started a gun buy-back. People have voluntarily given up their guns to symbolically support change. This has changed the way we view guns and gun violence. Nothing can bring back the children and teachers who were killed in Connecticut, but we can make sure their deaths were not in vain. We can change the way we look at guns. We can change the way we look at crime. We can do a better job at protecting our most precious treasure -- our children.

According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control), there was another tragedy where 2,149 children were killed in a single day. It was not a virus or a disease. It is the number of abortions performed in the United States on a daily basis (most recent data is from 2009 totaling 784,507 abortions. This number is low, as several states failed to report their abortion totals to the CDC).

Where is the outrage for those children? Why are the deaths of 26 able to motivate the president, Congress, the Senate, the media, Wall Street and the public in demanding reform and gun legislation so that 26 children are never killed again? Today, 2,149 babies will be killed. These babies would have grown up to be children and attend schools just like the one in Connecticut. These babies were innocent. Just like the children in Connecticut.

Why is the killing of 2,149 children in a single day legal justified and the killing of 26 children in a single day considered a national crisis? No matter how you look at it, a child dies when aborted just like a child dies when shot with a gun. The end result is a country robbed of our most precious treasure -- our children.

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