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Rhubarb roundup: Harvest some stalks and give a new recipe a try

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Rhubarb roundup: Harvest some stalks and give a new recipe a try
Worthington Minnesota 300 11th Street / P.O. Box 639 56187

Since my neighbor’s rhubarb plant was recently sacrificed in favor of a new garage, I have no point of reference, but I would guess that our recent timely rains have benefitted the local rhubarb crop. So just as timely is this selection of rhubarb recipes that have been brought to my attention in recent days.


I was flagged down on Sailboard Beach during last week’s Worthington Windsurfing Regatta for a request to look up this Almond Rhubarb Coffeecake recipe. It was originally printed in my mom’s “Mixing & Musing” column 10 years ago, and rated a mention in the Daily Globe’s Reminiscing column last week. The recipe originally came from the files of Mary Toso, formerly of Worthington, now of the Twin Cities area.

Almond Rhubarb Coffeecake

Grease two 9-inch round pans. Preheat oven to 350. Beat together 1½ cups brown sugar, 2/3 cup corn oil, 1 egg and 1 teaspoon vanilla. In another bowl, mix together 2¼ cups flour, 1 teaspoon soda and 1 teaspoon salt. Add to sugar mixture, alternating with 1 cup milk.

Stir in 1½ cups chopped rhubarb and ½ cup sliced almonds. Pour into prepared pans. Mix 1/3 cup sugar, ¼ cup sliced almonds and 1 tablespoon melted butter. Sprinkle over batter. Bake 30 to 35 minutes. Cool. Refrigerate leftovers.

Former Daily Globe staff writer Franny White, who now lives in Kennewick, Wash., posted on Facebook about having made this cobbler. I put in my request for the recipe, and she obliged. Since it makes use of fat-free and reduced-calorie ingredients, it’s a somewhat-diet-friendly dessert.

Strawberry-Rhubarb Cobbler

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Coat an 8-inch square baking pan with cooking spray.

In a large bowl, combine 16 ounces unsweetened frozen strawberries, thawed for 15 minutes; 14 ounces fresh or frozen rhubarb, cut into 1-inch pieces (thawed for 15 minutes if frozen); ⅓ cup sugar and 1 tablespoon cornstarch. Mix well and spoon mixture into bottom of pan.

In a large bowl or food processor, combine 1⅓ cups all-purpose flour, 2 tablespoons sugar, ¾ teaspoon baking powder and ¼ teaspoon baking soda. Add 4 tablespoons reduced-calorie margarine and mix with fingers or process until mixture resembles coarse bread crumbs. Add ½ cup fat-free sour cream sour cream and ¼ cup fat-free milk and mix until dough comes together.

Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface and knead a few times until blended.

Divide dough into 16 equal pieces and roll each piece into a small bowl. Place balls on top of strawberry-rhubarb mixture and gently press down to flatten. Brush the surface of dough with 1 large egg, lightly beaten, and sprinkle 1 tablespoon sugar over top.

Bake until filling is bubbly and top is golden brown, about 45 minutes. Cool 15 minutes before serving.

When we invite friend Myra Palmer over for a gathering, we can usually count on her to bring dessert. Most recently, she came toting a pan of these bars.

Rhubarb Oatmeal Bars

For crust, combine ½ cup chopped pecans, 1½ cups rolled oats, 1 cup brown sugar, ¼ teaspoon salt, 1½ cups flour, 1 cup softened butter and ¼ teaspoon baking soda; mix until crumbly. Pat half of the mixture into a 9- by 13-inch pan.

For filling, in a medium saucepan combine 4 cups chopped rhubarb, 1¼ cups sugar, 2 tablespoons cornstarch and ¼ cup water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and continue to cook, stirring frequently, until mixture is clear. Stir in 1 teaspoon vanilla.

Pour filling over crust. Sprinkle with remaining crumb mixture.

Bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees. Allow to cool before slicing into serving-sized bars.

A few weeks ago, I put out a request for rhubarb recipes, and a few days later a sheaf of them appeared on my desk, submitted by Ruth Nystrom. Here are a few from her files.

Rhubarb Loaf

Combine 1 ½ cups brown sugar, ⅔ cup oil, 1 egg, 1 cup milk soured with 1 teaspoon vinegar, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon baking soda, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 2 ½ cups flour, 1 ½ cups diced rhubarb and ½ cup chopped nuts. Spoon batter into 1 large or 2 small loaf pans.

Combine ½ cup sugar with 1 tablespoon butter until crumbly, and sprinkle over top of loaf.

Bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour. Don’t cut or remove from pan for 24 hours.

Rhubarb Upside Down Cake

Prepare 1 package yellow or white cake mix according to package directions. Place batter in a greased and floured 9- by 13-inch pan.

Top batter with 2 cups diced rhubarb. Sprinkle with 1 cup sugar and one 3-ounce package dry Strawberry Jell-O.

Bake according to directions on cake mix.

Turn each serving out onto dessert plate upside down and top with whipped cream.

Frozen Rhubarb Dessert

Combine 1 ¼ cups crushed vanilla wafers and ¼ cup melted butter. Pan into a 9-inch pan and freeze. When crust is frozen, spread with 1 quart softened vanilla ice cream. Return to freezer.

Combine 4 cups cut-up rhubarb and 2 cups sugar. Let stand overnight.

Cook rhubarb mixture until mush. Add 1 package strawberry Jell-O, stirring until dissolved. Cool until it starts to congeal. Spread over ice cream layer.

Refreeze, top with whipped topping and freeze once more.

Rhubarb Coconut Cookies

Combine ½ cup shortening, 1 ⅓ cups brown sugar and 1 egg. Beat well.

Mix 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon baking soda, ½ teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon cinnamon and ½ teaspoon nutmeg. Add to creamed mixture alternately with ¼ cup milk. Stir in ½ cup coconut, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup chopped nuts and 1 cup very finely chopped rhubarb.

Drop mixture by spoon onto greased cookie sheet. Bake at 350 degrees for about 12 minutes.

Beth Rickers
Beth Rickers is the veteran in the newspaper staff with 25 years as the Daily Globe's Features Editor. Interests include cooking, traveling and beer tasting and making with her home-brewing husband, Bryan. She writes an Area Voices blog called Lagniappe, which is a Creole term that means "a little something extra." It can be found at  
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