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Sex offender sentenced for assaulting worker

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DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — One month after the Iowa Supreme Court ordered his release from a state treatment facility, a dangerous sex offender will stay behind bars at least through May after pleading guilty to assaulting a state employee.

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Anthony William Geltz, 20, pleaded guilty to assaulting a health care worker at the Cherokee Mental Health Institute, and was sentenced last week to a prison term that will last until at least May 20, the Des Moines Register reported.

Geltz was placed in a locked wing of the Cherokee institution in April 2012, after a court declared that he was a sexually violent predator and needed to be committed for treatment.

But the Iowa Supreme Court ruled last month that the state could not keep Geltz locked up under the law because his sexual abuse offenses were handled in juvenile court. Justices said they were concerned that Geltz would reoffend after he is released given his long history of sexual misconduct, but that they had no choice since the law does not treat juvenile offenses as criminal convictions.

In 2008, Geltz pleaded guilty in juvenile court of second-degree sexual abuse after he abused a child at a Davenport restaurant when he was 14. At age 12, Geltz was sent to live at the Annie Wittenmyer Home in Davenport after he abused his stepsister and other neighborhood children, according to court records.

As a teenager, he was sent to the State Training School for Boys in Eldora, where he was disciplined a dozen times for sexual misconduct, records show.

When he turned 18, Geltz was evaluated by the state, and a judge determined he should be confined to Cherokee as a sexually violent predator.

Clinton County Attorney Mike Wolf, said Tuesday that it's too early to know what legal options, if any, can be used to keep Geltz from being released after he finishes his prison sentence.

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