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Editorial: We’re still here and serving our readers

Since our initial publication date of Aug. 31, 1872, the Daily Globe has remained a constant in the Worthington community. We are proud of that longevity, and we owe it all to you — our readers. After all, this is your paper, and today — just like nearly 145 years ago — our goal remains the same: to be a valued source for news, sports, opinion, features and more.

Times, of course, are significantly different than they were in, say, 2002, never mind 1872. Though there have been numerous changes over the years, we have still continued to make local and regional content our biggest priority, even though it may be delivered in ways other than simply traditional print. And, thanks to the ownership of our parent company, Forum Communications Co., and the development of Forum News Service, that high-quality journalism we produce here in Worthington is circulated to newspapers across the Midwest.

Forum News Service, created in 2012, not only helps us distribute our reporting over a broad area, but also allows us to deliver news from several other papers — both FCC-owned and otherwise — to you. Forum News Service reporters aren’t just based in Fargo, N.D. They hail from newspapers in Bemidji, Willmar, Brainerd, St. Paul, Alexandria, Duluth … to name just a few. It is through Forum News Service that the Daily Globe can continue to supplement its southwest Minnesota and northwest Iowa coverage with award-winning reporting from these other communities.

This level of coverage that Forum News Service provides is important to us — but not as critical as letting our readers know what’s happening in their backyard. We have been, and will continue to be, your top local source for news and information. From coverage of a Worthington City Council meeting to a feature on an interesting person with area ties, we’ll have our readers covered. At the same time, we are always eager to hear what our readers want to see and read. Wonder why something might not be in the Daily Globe? Let us know. Have a good story idea? Give us a call. After all — again — this is your paper.

We maintain that newspapers — whether read in print, on their websites or via social media links — are the best ways to reach the largest numbers of people. An integral part of what makes this possible, of course, is revenue generated by advertising, subscriptions and other sources, and it should come as no surprise to many that newspapers across the nation are struggling right now from a revenue standpoint. At the Daily Globe, that challenge is visible in the recent business decision to stop publishing the WOW (What’s on When) television section in our print edition. We have heard several readers express their disappointment with this decision during the past few days, and we share that sentiment. However, the WOW section for years (not just recently) has simply not carried the advertising revenue needed to support its printing; one loyal advertiser in a 12-page section is not enough to cover costs. (At this point, we will continue to offer the WOW to subscribers through our electronic edition.)

Moving forward, we cannot express strongly enough that we value readers’ thoughts on what their newspaper should be. What we will be, without question, is a newspaper with operations in Worthington. While printing operations moved this past winter to a FCC-owned facility in Sioux Falls, S.D. — a transition that gave both the Daily Globe and a sister paper, the Mitchell (S.D.) Daily Republic, the opportunity to exchange aging equipment for that which is state of the art  — we continue to be staffed in the same Worthington office on 11th Street that we’ve been in for decades. The former printing facility next door may be for sale or for lease, but the rest of the newspaper is still very much right here.

We are extremely thankful to our readers and believe they appreciate the value of what our newspaper continues to offer What other product comes delivered to you each day — whether it’s in a print or electronic edition — for an average price of 55 cents? We look forward to being the best community newspaper we can be for many years to come.

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