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Decadent Décor branches out with women's fashions, in-home consultations

WORTHINGTON -- It's been four and a half years since Michele Vander Meulen opened Decadent D?cor, and in that time she has seen her store -- and her everyday job -- grow and evolve in exciting ways.

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Michele Vander Meulen takes a moment to show some of her products at Decadent Decor. (Tim Middagh / Daily Globe)

WORTHINGTON - It’s been four and a half years since Michele Vander Meulen opened Decadent Décor, and in that time she has seen her store - and her everyday job - grow and evolve in exciting ways.

In addition to home décor items there is a corner of women’s fashions, and, if a person is up for it, Michele is also available for in-home consultations on decorating and design for a new home, a remodel, or just a sprucing up.

“There was a need for this in the area,” Vander Meulen revealed. “I’ve been doing more and more consultation work. The store opened the door for me to do this. People would come in and ask for advice, show me pictures. I would help my friends and by word of mouth it blossomed into more. Now, if someone comes in and wants my advice, we can make an appointment and sit down and talk more formally.

“I’ve always enjoyed decorating,” Vander Meulen disclosed. “I’ve torn out walls and floors because I wanted a change. My whole family is that way. If we want something done around the house we just do it ourselves. I guess we have a knack for it. We’ve been born with it; we’re all very artistic.”

Vander Meulen is willing to go in whatever direction a client wants regarding style and will do as much or as little as the client requires.

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“I will give ideas to get you going,” she explained. “It can be as simple as just giving some thoughts on an upgrade for your home, or it can be as in-depth as picking out millwork. I can run to a store to take pictures to give you ideas, or grab samples. I can do the shopping for you or simply suggest things you can purchase. I will work with the client to do whatever they’d like.”

Whether its flooring advice - why or why not to purchase this or that type of floor - or presenting paint options or faucet ideas or the location of a wall outlet, Vander Meulen has wisdom on it all that she is willing to share. Sometimes her consults are as simple as advice on furniture or bedding and sometimes they’re far greater.

“The big thing is to make sure it’s their style,” Vander Meulen shared. “Working with what they have and what they like. Finding their style. People don’t always know what they like. I will show them pictures and we can decide if they’re very traditional or with a contemporary mix or if they have heirloom pieces they want to fit in, we’ll make that work.

“I work with them,” Vander Meulen assured. “A lot of time it’s about tweaking what they have and maybe adding one item to tie it all together. Or I’m open to formally designing their whole home or their cabin.”

Some questions Vander Meulen might ask a client include things as simple as, “Are you a couch sitter or a chair sitter?” Or, “Do you like subtle color or splashes of color?”

“Spring is the perfect time to give your home or office a refresher,” Vander Meulen encouraged. “We can offer a personalized design, whether you're looking for a traditional feel, a rustic look, a modern twist or even for that designer look.”

Decadent Décor is located at 1607 N. McMillan St. and can be reached by phone at 343-5000.

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Home decoration items are displayed at Decadent Decor in Worthington. (Special to the Daily Globe)

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