ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Grim day at Target as 1,700 Twin Cities jobs are cut

MINNEAPOLIS -- The young Target Corp. employee was told to come to a meeting. The elevator was filled with co-workers crying. That's when she knew her job was gone.

MINNEAPOLIS - The young Target Corp. employee was told to come to a meeting. The elevator was filled with co-workers crying. That’s when she knew her job was gone.
“It’s crazy that this was my dream, and it was ripped away from me,” the woman, who did not give her name, said Tuesday morning through tears. “It’s such a great company. That’s the worst part.”
On a grim day at Target’s Minneapolis headquarters, the retailer laid off 1,700 corporate workers and eliminated an additional 1,400 open positions. The layoffs left Target with about 11,300 Twin Cities corporate employees, down from 13,000 when the day began.
Starting soon after 9 a.m., the first laid-off employees began emerging from the headquarters tower on Nicollet Mall. Then groups came out in waves, some in tears, many carrying boxes.
Combined with the 550 layoffs announced in January, Tuesday’s cuts mean 3,650 Target corporate jobs have disappeared this year, the great majority from the Twin Cities.
Tuesday’s layoffs - about 13 percent of the Twin Cities headquarters workforce - seemed to touch most departments, sweeping through every Target corporate building in Minnesota and affecting employees ranging from newcomers to longtime veterans.
Target didn’t provide specifics on which departments were hit. But in a social-media world, the fear and dread were posted and tweeted all day long - with Target employees anxious to know if they survived and wondering about their friends.
Many did not. There were layoffs in marketing, in merchandising, in technology, in financial services, in human resources, in design and in departments large and small throughout Target headquarters.
The move was part of a $2 billion cost-cutting push that executives said last week would make Target leaner and more agile.

What To Read Next
Wednesday’s community input meeting at Worthington High School was the third of four planned by the Minnesota Attorney General’s Office.
Rod Burkard now has the opportunity to compete in August at the national event in Pennsylvania.
Women plan to add a mini market and deli to their business in the coming months.
Benson and Turner Foods will process cattle and hogs at Waubun, Minnesota, on the White Earth Reservation with the help of a USDA grant.