WORTHINGTON - Over the next few weeks, Crossroads Care Center will transition from its current model of nursing home care to an exclusive focus on Alzheimer’s and dementia treatment.

The new program will be called Seasons Community at Crossroads.

“The future of healthcare is such that facilities should consider specializing,” said Brad Molgard, Crossroads administrator.

Knowing that memory care is constantly evolving, Molgard and his staff have been planning this change since October 2018.

Currently, Crossroads offers memory care for residents who need it.  However, Molgard said, “there is a difference between taking care of an Alzheimer’s patient and having a state-of-the-art Alzheimer’s center.”

Next month, Crossroads will offer the latter. As Crossroads prepares for its new program, which is set to begin around the end of June, residents who don’t have an Alzheimer’s or dementia diagnosis will be moved to Worthington’s South Shore Care Center, where Molgard is also the administrator.

Part of the preparation phase is additional training for members of Crossroads staff.

Five staff members traveled to the Twin Cities Tuesday to attend a conference with Teepa Snow, a national Alzheimer’s expert. They will help train the remainder of staff.

As the new program grows, Molgard said there will be opportunities to hire more staff.

The physical building of Crossroads will not undergo construction, and needs only an updated security system. Part of that new system will include 20 “locked units” for patients designated “at-risk for elopement.” These will lock with keypads codes.

The other 30 units will be labelled “secure units” for those patients who have not shown a proclivity for wandering.

“We are really excited about the new program,” Molgard said. He hopes it will draw patients from all over the region, as people tend to travel further for specialized care.

Molgard added that the goal of Seasons Community at Crossroads is to complement - not compete with - other assisted living facilities in Worthington.

“Nobody does an Alzheimer’s program like what we’re intending,” he said. The new program will be an asset and additional resource for long-term care in the community, he added,