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Rock County Fair asks you to ‘Mark That Card’

LUVERNE -- After a successful introduction at the 2017 county fair, the Rock County 4-H program is launching a repeat of its "Mark That Card" contest this week, asking fairgoers to judge a set of four beef, sheep, swine and goats to see how well ...

LUVERNE - After a successful introduction at the 2017 county fair, the Rock County 4-H program is launching a repeat of its “Mark That Card” contest this week, asking fairgoers to judge a set of four beef, sheep, swine and goats to see how well they score against the judge.

The contest has three divisions - one for Cloverbud 4-H members, another for 4-H youths and an open class contest open to anyone of any age.

“We’re trying to promote livestock judging and show it’s not just about the care of animals - that you can interact with livestock in a different way,” said Rock County 4-H Summer Intern Ryleigh Beers.

The Rock County Fair begins today in Luverne and continues through Saturday evening. However, the livestock must be judged by “Mark That Card” participants prior to the species judging. That means the four swine in the contest must be ranked before the 8 a.m. 4-H swine show on Thursday, the goats and sheep judged prior to their respective shows Thursday afternoon, and the beef judged prior to the 8 a.m. Friday 4-H beef show.

Signs will be displayed in the livestock barns above the animals that are to be ranked in the contest, with the four sheep, goat and beef species to be penned side-by-side from 11 a.m. to noon on Thursday, Beers said.

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Contest cards will be available in an envelope on the outside of the livestock barn. Once they’ve been completed, they can either be turned in at the 4-H fair office, or to the announcer’s platform prior to the start of the livestock shows for each species.

In addition to the judging divisions, 4-H’ers who complete the cards will be divided into junior, intermediate and senior age divisions.

“The top judge of each division will get a gift card donated by Mente Cattle Company,” Beers said. “In order to be eligible for that, the youth has to judge all four species.”

The top judge in the open class division will be rewarded with a voucher to the 4-H food stand, and the Cloverbud winner will also receive a prize, although what that prize is has yet to be determined.

Beers said after the success of last year’s contest, people wanted it back again this year. She’s hopeful that it will generate interest among youths in competing on the 4-H General Livestock judging team.

“We had a 4-H team last year and we’re working to build interest in that,” she said. “We’re just excited to get more people involved.”

Related Topics: 4-H
Julie Buntjer became editor of The Globe in July 2021, after working as a beat reporter at the Worthington newspaper since December 2003. She has a bachelor's degree in agriculture journalism from South Dakota State University.
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