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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Previous policy limited only birds from avian influenza hotspots.
The Conservation Stewardship Program, delivered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, is highly popular with farmland owners in North Dakota as a way to increase environmentally-friendly practices. Todd C. Hagel, assistant state conservation, describes the basics in the rules.
The U.S. Department of Agriculture on Wednesday, July 20, 2022, changed the formula for disaster payments for above-normal livestock losses to reflect truer values of baby calves and other animals, in the wake of the April 2022 “Blizzard Haley” storm complex that hit North Dakota. The previous administration had administratively in 2020 added a "bottom-tier" of payment for baby calves that undervalued the animals.
A series of April blizzards created a “long tail” of cattle illnesses, including pneumonia and scours. Losses range from zero to hundreds of calves, on top of record-setting drought and low feed and forage supplies. The numbers hide some of the effects — the loss in value when either a calf or a cow is lost, leaving orphans. 

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Cooperative effort aims to help cattle rancher, wolves and wolf researchers.
The USDA livestreamed the report after it was released to the public on March 31. View the report here.
Highly pathogenic avian influenza has been confirm in poultry flocks in Meeker and Mower counties in Minnesota.

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