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Authorities release name of northern Minn. shooting victim

WALKER, Minn.-Authorities have released the name of the woman killed Nov. 12 in a shooting at a Cass Lake residence.Cass County Sheriff Tom Burch identified the victim as Brandi Lynn Shank, 25, of Cass Lake.The sheriff's office received a report ...

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Brandon Roy is charged in the fatal shooting.
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WALKER, Minn.-Authorities have released the name of the woman killed Nov. 12 in a shooting at a Cass Lake residence.

Cass County Sheriff Tom Burch identified the victim as Brandi Lynn Shank, 25, of Cass Lake.

The sheriff's office received a report of a shooting at 8:17 a.m. Nov. 12 at a home in the Cass Lake area. When Cass County deputies arrived, they located Shank with a gunshot wound to the head inside the home. Lifesaving efforts were performed, but she died at the scene.

Brandon Joseph Roy, 24, Cass Lake, was charged Nov. 14 in Cass County District Court in Walker with one count of second-degree unintentional murder and one count of first-degree aggravated robbery.

According to a criminal complaint, Shank was killed during a robbery gone wrong. Two witnesses told law enforcement they were present during the shooting. Either Roy or Anthony LaRose fired a handgun twice, according to the complaint. One of the shots went through the bathroom door and hit the victim in the center of the forehead.

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About two and a half weeks after the shooting, Cass County authorities located three people of interest sought in connection with the homicide. The three people-Larose, 28; Sara Renae LaRose, 41; and Ileisha Lynee Guinn, 25-are cooperating with authorities.

The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension and Leech Lake Tribal Police are assisting the sheriff's office with the investigation.

Related Topics: WALKERCASS LAKE
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