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Benefit is Friday for Sheldon couple

SHELDON, Iowa -- When most couples learn they are expecting a little bundle of joy, it's a time of celebration -- excitement mixed with nervousness and a whole lot of waiting. But when health problems are found early in the pregnancy, it means co...

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SamanthaJo Buffington and her boyfriend, Dustin Meyeraan, are expecting twin boys who share the same amniotic sac and placenta. A benefit for the couple is planned Friday evening in Sheldon, Iowa. (Special to The Globe)

SHELDON, Iowa - When most couples learn they are expecting a little bundle of joy, it’s a time of celebration - excitement mixed with nervousness and a whole lot of waiting. But when health problems are found early in the pregnancy, it means countless tests, numerous doctor visits and stacks of bills.

It’s certainly not the scenario SamanthaJo Buffington and her boyfriend, Dustin Meyeraan, would have wished for their unborn twin sons, but one they are facing head-on with an upbeat attitude and positive outlook.

The couple is expecting what is commonly referred to as MoMo twins - Monoamniotic-Monochorionic babies that share the same amniotic sac and the same placenta, but have their own umbilical cord.

A spaghetti dinner and silent auction benefit for the family is planned from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday at the Eagles Club, 411 Park St., Sheldon, Iowa.

 

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For more of this story, see Wednesday's print edition and dglobe.com.

Julie Buntjer became editor of The Globe in July 2021, after working as a beat reporter at the Worthington newspaper since December 2003. She has a bachelor's degree in agriculture journalism from South Dakota State University.
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