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Brandenburg focuses on spring

ELY -- Residents of the Upper Midwest are well aware of the fickleness of springtime, during which the weather can run the gamut from blizzards to sun-filled 80-plus-degree days as the landscape awakens from its winter slumber.Photographer Jim Br...

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ELY - Residents of the Upper Midwest are well aware of the fickleness of springtime, during which the weather can run the gamut from blizzards to sun-filled 80-plus-degree days as the landscape awakens from its winter slumber.
Photographer Jim Brandenburg has captured the many facets of the season in a new feature, “93 Days of Spring” published in the April issue of National Geographic magazine. This latest project for NGM contains the most number of photographs in the 128-year history of the magazine.
The previous record for the magazine was Brandenburg’s 90 autumn images in “North Woods Journal” in the November 1997 issue. His summer picture story, “Boundary Waters,” in the June 2013 issue was the very first digital photography story published in the magazine’s history.
As with those previous stories, all the photographs in the spring coverage were made in Minnesota, mainly around Brandenburg’s home, Ravenwood, near Ely next to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, or in areas he has lived and knows well. The last four photographs were made at Touch the Sky Prairie, a mile from where he was born near Luverne, or Blue Mounds State Park, where he made his first photographs as a young boy.
Brandenburg worked as a photographer for the Daily Globe in the 1970s before going on to travel the globe for National Geographic.
“Shooting locally may seem counterintuitive to some,” explains Brandenburg in the feature. “Cameras seek the exotic, and for good reason - novelty is inspiring. As a National Geographic photographer for more than three decades, I’ve made millions of images in far-flung places - majestic African landscapes, remote groups of indigenous people, lively street scenes in Paris.
“But sometimes the most revealing photographs are of the places we know best. When you shoot an area you know in your bones, as I do the North Woods and prairies of Minnesota, it touches on something primal. Familiarity and intimate knowledge of the subject come to light and manifest themselves in the frame.”
A book titled “The Awakening” will be published from the spring project. It follows Brandenburg’s best sellers, “Looking for the Summer” and “Chased By the Light” from the summer and autumn seasonal coverage.
Additionally, Brandenburg has been working on Nature365, a one-minute-daily video online for the entire year, through which millions of viewers have witnessed a moment of nature from Jim’s surroundings. The combined total of meditative videos for the year equals around 6½ hours worth of footage. Produced in France, Nature365 can be viewed at http://nature365.tv .
A free, condensed digital version of “93 Days of Spring” is available on the National Geographic Magazine website: http://proof.nationalgeographic.com/2016/03/08/93springdays/ .
For more information on Brandenburg and his projects, go to jimbrandenburg.com.

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