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Budget Breakdown: $832,096

What it is: This is the amount Nobles County budgeted for buildings in 2016.What it was last year: $665,000Total county budget: $34,372,047Percentage of total budget: 2.4 percentHow it's used: The largest share of the building fund in 2016 is the...

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This 2012 photo shows workers performing tuckpointing on a Nobles County Government Center tower.

What it is: This is the amount Nobles County budgeted for buildings in 2016.
What it was last year: $665,000
Total county budget: $34,372,047
Percentage of total budget: 2.4 percent
How it’s used: The largest share of the building fund in 2016 is the $400,000 budgeted for a potential garage expansion at the Prairie Justice Center. Another $100,000 was budgeted to replace the roof on one of the older public works buildings; and $95,000 was budgeted for foundation repairs to the Government Center. Also in the budget are miscellaneous projects, access control and asbestos removal in a public works building.
Quote: “We built up a building fund for some of this stuff. We’ve taken a lot of the wind (energy production) tax and set that aside for one-time projects.” - Nobles County Administrator Tom Johnson.
Staff: The county has two maintenance workers. Construction projects are contracted.
More information: After a few years of drought conditions, the county may consider some landscaping improvements in 2016. Also on the drawing board is improved signage for the Nobles County Government Center.

Julie Buntjer became editor of The Globe in July 2021, after working as a beat reporter at the Worthington newspaper since December 2003. She has a bachelor's degree in agriculture journalism from South Dakota State University.
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