ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

City open to parcel sales to private entities

Worthington City Hall

WORTHINGTON — The Worthington City Council and the Worthington Economic Development Authority (which comprise the same members) voted Monday to allow the sale of two parcels of land to private entities, following requests.

Grace Community Church has requested to purchase a stretch of land to the northwest of the church property, centered between various residential and institutional property lines. City code and the city's property disposal policy dictate that since the land does not conform to zoning requirements, it may be sold to an abutting property owner without holding a public sale. City council members agreed to sell the land to Grace and directed staff to come up with a reasonable price.

Grace_Property
The approximate location of the land Grace Community Church requested to purchase is locked in the middle of residential properties.

Another private organization has inquired about a parcel located west of U.S. 59 and south of 27th Street. A portion of the property was sold last year to allow construction of a Frito-Lay warehouse. An unnamed firm is interested in starting business in Worthington and has requested to purchase the 2.21-acre tract, which is owned by the Economic Development Authority, to build an agriculture-related retail establishment. The EDAu was open to this sale and will negotiate on the price of the land.

ADVERTISEMENT

For more city council new, see Wednesday's edition of The Globe or dglobe.com.

Related Topics: GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
What To Read Next
The North Dakota Highway Patrol investigated the Wednesday, Jan. 25, crash.
Fundraising is underway to move the giant ball of twine from the Highland, Wisconsin, home of creator James Frank Kotera, who died last month at age 75, 44 years after starting the big ball.
“We see that when things happen in the coastal areas, a few years later, they start trending toward the Midwest,” said Rep. Ben Krohmer, serving his first term in the House.
“This is sensationalism at its finest, and it does not deserve to be heard in our state capitol,” Rep. Erin Healy, a Democrat and one of 10 votes against the bill in the 70-person chamber, said.