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Council orders repairs to Thompson Hotel

WORTHINGTON -- The Worthington City Council on Monday ordered repairs to the 39-unit Thompson Hotel apartments. The council specified repairs must begin by June 1 and be completed by July 31. Repairs include remedying many of the 99 violations fo...

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Pictured is the Thompson Hotel in Worthington. (Karl Evers-Hillstrom / The Globe)

WORTHINGTON - The Worthington City Council on Monday ordered repairs to the 39-unit Thompson Hotel apartments.

The council specified repairs must begin by June 1 and be completed by July 31. Repairs include remedying many of the 99 violations found by Housing Inspector Rod Odell during his early April inspections.

Odell’s report includes evidence of mold in 18 units and pests in four. It also details broken ceiling tiles, broken windows, peeling paint, non-operational smoke alarms, stains and leaks, among other issues.

Council members and the owners agreed the leaky roof needs to be repaired before mold and insect issues can be fully remedied. Bids for a replacement roof came in between $55,000 to $60,000.

Barry Gronke, attorney for owners Curtis and Teresa Williams, said managing the building became difficult when Curtis encountered serious health issues. He said financing has also been difficult, thanks in large part to bad publicity - which caused several banks and a potential buyer to bow out. He asked that the council provide a loan or grant for the project, but the request was not taken up.

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For the problems that aren't fixed in the given timeframe, the city could make repairs itself if the owners comply, or go through District Court to do so. The cost would be levied onto the property owner through special assessments, which can be paid back in five or fewer annual installments at 8 percent annual interest - a rate that Gronke said is ”one step short from being a loan shark.”

 

For more of this story, see Wednesday’s print edition and dglobe.com.

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