MINNEAPOLIS — Derek Chauvin, the former Minneapolis police officer charged with the murder of George Floyd, posted bond Wednesday, Oct. 7, and has been released from custody.

Chauvin, 44, posted a $1 million non-cash bond, according to court documents. A notice of release with conditions was also filed Wednesday, allowing Chauvin to leave Oak Park Heights prison, where he has been held pending trial.

Under his conditional release Chauvin must remain law-abiding, not have any contact with Floyd’s family, not work in law enforcement or security, surrender firearms and firearm permits or licenses and not leave Minnesota, among other conditions.

Chauvin was charged with second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter after he kneeled on Floyd’s neck for almost nine minutes on May 25. Three other former police officers, J. Alexander Kueng, Thomas Lane and Tou Thao have all been charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder while committing a felony and with aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter with culpable negligence.

According to court documents, Kueng, Lane and Thao already posted bail of $750,000 each and have been released from custody for months pending trial. None of the former officers have entered in pleas yet, a Minnesota Judicial Branch spokesperson said. The former officers filed for their charges to be dismissed, but their motions were denied.

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A trial date for the former officers is currently scheduled for March 8, 2021.

Gov. Tim Walz activated the Minnesota National Guard “out of an abundance of caution for the safety of Minnesotans” in light of Derek Chauvin posting bond, Walz said in a Wednesday news release.

The Minnesota National Guard is mobilizing 100 Guard soldiers as well as providing equipment and facilities needed to support public safety services, according to the release. Additionally, the Minnesota State Patrol has mobilized 100 state troopers and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources has mobilized 75 conservation officers to aid local law enforcement.

On May 25, Chauvin kneeled on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes after he was taken into custody for using a counterfeit $20 bill at Cup Foods on Chicago Avenue in Minneapolis. Despite Floyd’s pleas for Chauvin to stop and that he could not breathe, Chauvin did not remove his knee from Floyd’s neck, according to the charges. Floyd was unresponsive for the last two minutes and 53 seconds Chauvin kneeled on his neck.

According to the charges, Lane and Kueng were the first officers to arrive at the scene after someone reported that a fake bill had been used at Cup Foods. Chauvin and Thao then arrived shortly after. Lane restrained Floyd’s legs while Chauvin kneeled on his neck. All of the officer’s held their positions, despite Floyd’s pleas, the charges said.

A Hennepin County autopsy ruled Floyd’s death as a homicide, caused by police restraint and neck compression.

Floyd’s death sparked widespread protest around the world against racism and police brutality.

Forum News Service contributed to this report.