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Digital advertising presentation is Wednesday

WORTHINGTON -- Local business owners will have a chance to to learn more about digital advertising at 9 a.m. Wednesday in the Hy-Vee Club Room. The free event will feature a presentation by Digital Account Manager Chris Van Zandt from digital mar...

WORTHINGTON - Local business owners will have a chance to to learn more about digital advertising at 9 a.m. Wednesday in the Hy-Vee Club Room.

  The free event will feature a presentation by Digital Account Manager Chris Van Zandt from digital marketing and advertising agency AdCellerant.

  “We can offer more than just what is on the page and we want our customers to know that,” Daily Globe Advertising Manager Chandra Carlson said, “Often when people think of us, they think of what you see in the newspaper -- which is great. But we have the ability to help our customers brave the terrain of online advertising and so much more.”  

  Digital advertising gets more popular every day. According to The Wall Street Journal, digital advertising overtook print ads in total spending towards the end of 2011 and is poised to outspend TV by 2018. Despite the internet’s massive audience, small businesses have been slow to try online advertising, which Van Zandt said was understandable.

  “I think it’s stepping into the realm of the online world that’s daunting for people,” Van Zandt said. “There’s a few things to learn before jumping in.”

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  Van Zandt said business owners are often unsure about how effective online advertisements will be because they don’t know who will be seeing them.

  “A big thing with digital advertising compared to print is not knowing where the ads are being displayed because it might not appear as prominent,” Van Zandt said. “They’re not able to visualize where ads will be, when and where they will appear, unlike in a newspaper.”

  AdCellerant puts a focus on local online advertising, trying to make it more appealing for small business owners who have long avoided the platform. Digital ads - along with social media - often have a much different audience than newspaper ads, which is why Van Zandt said it was helpful to have a diverse mix of ads to reach a larger audience.

  “Social media’s great,” Van Zandt said. “It’s important to tie that into your advertising strategy for a well-rounded approach.”

  However, Van Zandt warned not to be too ambitious or a business could stretch itself too thin.

  “We sometimes see people trying to do too much with too little,” Van Zandt said. “They reach out too far without enough resources and don’t do it the right way.”

  That’s just one area where the Daily Globe  advertising team can help a small business; planning, although generally speaking, there’s no perfect advertising advice for all businesses. Every case is different -  depending on the size of the business and products it offers - according to Van Zandt.

  “We want our customers to feel comfortable and confident with digital advertising,” Carlson said. “Van Zant’s presentation will offer great insight into digital marketing. By pairing with AdCellerant, we have the tools to help any size business large or small. We are here to help with any advertising need -- print or digital. We are happy we can give our customers a well-rounded advertising strategy to meet all of their needs.

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  “When Chris leaves, you have our team to rely on and help make your business grow in new ways,” Carlson added.

  Information and advice on digital advertising will be discussed in further detail at the event. Breakfast will be served at 8:30 a.m. Seats are limited and can be reserved by calling Carlson at 376-7334. Attendees will have a chance to win a digital advertising campaign worth $500.

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