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Dollars for Scholars awards gifts to 13 WHS students

WORTHINGTON -- The Worthington Dollars for Scholars chapter awarded $17,000 in scholarships to 13 members of the Worthington High School Class of 2019 in a Wednesday evening ceremony at Memorial Auditorium Performing Arts Center.

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Worthington High School Dollars for Scholars recipients recognized Wednesday evening include. front (from left): Joselin Gonzales Mejia, Taylor Eggers, New Bu, Pwe Ku, Anna Meyer, Sydney Ponto. Back: Davis Moore, Jack Johnson, Tad Stewart, Blaine Doeden, Sarah Spieker, Thomas Bauman, Sean Souksavath. (Special to The Globe)

WORTHINGTON - The Worthington Dollars for Scholars chapter awarded $17,000 in scholarships to 13 members of the Worthington High School Class of 2019 in a Wednesday evening ceremony at Memorial Auditorium Performing Arts Center.

 

An entirely volunteer-driven organization, Dollars for Scholars supports local graduates with funds to continue their post-high school educations, and the 2019 award amount brings the total dollars given to WHS graduates since 1988 to roughly $580,000. Annual per-person awards ranged from $1,000 to $2,500.

 

Awardees are evaluated anonymously and rated on a points basis that takes into account their personal data, a reference appraisal, class rank and GPAs and ACT scores, among other criteria. The 10-member Dollars for Scholars board, headed by President Adam Johnson, hosted the recent ceremony.

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The 2019 WHS Dollars for Scholars recipients are Thomas Bauman, New Bu, Blaine Doeden, Taylor Eggers, Jack Johnson, Pwe Ku, Joselin Gonzales Mejia, Anna Meyer, Davis Moore, Sydney Ponto, Sean Souksavath, Sarah Spieker and Tad Stewart.

 

Student applications are completed and submitted online, with a March 15 deadline. For more information about the local Dollars for Scholars chapter, including applications, donations or the June fundraising golf tournament, visit www.worthington.dollarsforscholars.org .

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