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Feed My Starving Children event is Friday, Saturday

WORTHINGTON -- Taking on a huge fund-raising project is never a sure thing, but pastors Scott Barber of Grace Community Church and Kristine Stewart of First Covenant, for the second time in two years, have taken on hosting a Feed My Starving Chil...

WORTHINGTON - Taking on a huge fund-raising project is never a sure thing, but pastors Scott Barber of Grace Community Church and Kristine Stewart of First Covenant, for the second time in two years, have taken on hosting a Feed My Starving Children Mobile Pack here in Worthington.

 

As was the case two years ago, they have seen the outcome far exceed their original prayers.

 

“From an original goal of raising $24,000, which equals 108,900 meals, we have been able to raise our meals to 132,228 and $29,033,” said Stewart. “We are less than a thousand dollars from that goal.”

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Donations came in from all woks of life in the region. Community groups, businesses, clubs, schools, churches, and individuals all contributed toward making this event possible.

 

Because of receiving addition funds, the team has been able to add many additional volunteer slots for this weekend’s event.  As of the time of this writing, volunteer slots are open for all three sessions: from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday; and 9 to 11 a.m. and noon to 2 p.m. There are also openings to help with setup from 4 to 6 p.m. and with cleanup from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday.

 

Children as young as age 5 are allowed to sign up and volunteer so long as they have an adult with them.

 

Barber explained in detail exactly what volunteers can expect throughout the three, two-hour packing sessions.

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“Volunteers will be led to one of 10 stations where meals will be packed,” he said, “An assembly line will be set up where someone holds open plastic bags to contain the meals under a funnel, another person puts in a scoop of dehydrated chicken, another vegetables, another rice. After a bag is filled it is weighed and then sealed, labeled and put in a box. From there the boxes are put onto a forklift and then into a truck.”

 

Given the wide variety in ages and the natural competition that often shows itself, the event will be far from dull.

 

“You will see a lot of energy as different groups compete against each other for the number of meals packed during their session,” elaborated Barber. “Other groups will be cheering and celebrating goals they have set. The whole room will cheer as benchmarks are achieved in the packing process.”

 

Before the volunteers are released to begin packing the meals, every group will go through a short orientation to the packing process, explaining not only exactly what they will be doing but also how and why FMSC does what it does as an organization. This allows everyone to get a clear vision for the greater purpose of the event as well as giving exact instruction on the various jobs. Upon arrival or departure, samples of the food will be available at the concession window for volunteers to taste.

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In between the two packing sessions on Saturday, at 11:15 a.m., there will be a short celebratory worship service for anyone interested in attending (it is not a requirement for volunteering). The service will include worship, a brief and encouraging message, prayer over the crates of packed food, prayer for safe delivery, and prayer for the children who will benefit from them.  

“We’re so excited that once again the community of Worthington has exceeded our expectations,” shared Barber. “Together we are having a global impact on starvation. With our new packing goal, we will be able to feel 360 children one meal per day for an entire year. For many of those kids, that’s the only food they get for that day.”

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