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Former probation agents’ criminal cases advance

WORTHINGTON -- Two former Rock Nobles Community Corrections agents' criminal cases that included alleged public employee misconduct moved forward this week in Nobles County District Court.

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Barraza

WORTHINGTON - Two former Rock Nobles Community Corrections agents’ criminal cases that included alleged public employee misconduct moved forward this week in Nobles County District Court.

According to a plea petition signed Aug. 29, Rebecca Barraza, 26, of Worthington, pleaded guilty to obstruction of legal process related to a spring incident when she refused to provide a blood sample to law enforcement despite having a valid search warrant to do so.

If the plea agreement is accepted by presiding Fifth Judicial District Judge Michael Trushenski, Barraza would receive a stay of imposition on the misdemeanor-level offense. A stay of imposition would allow Barraza to receive a lesser, gross misdemeanor conviction if she is compliant with the terms of her probation.

If sentenced in accordance in accordance to the plea agreement, Barraza would serve one year of unsupervised probation, pay for a chemical dependency assessment, pay a $300 fine and have no misdemeanor or greater offense throughout her probationary year. Seven other charges on two files would be dismissed.

Also this week, two criminal charges against Cynthia Banegas , 38, of Worthington - a former probation agent who was released from employment at the same time as Barraza - were continued for dismissal pending her compliance with a one-year unsupervised probationary term.

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Banegas

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