ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Garden City woman arrested after drug discovery

WORTHINGTON -- A Garden City woman was arrested Thursday after marijuana, methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia were allegedly discovered in her vehicle.

3990723+020718.N.DG_.DEPYPER mug.jpg

WORTHINGTON -- A Garden City woman was arrested Thursday after marijuana, methamphetamine and drug paraphernalia were allegedly discovered in her vehicle.

Davida Depyper, 56, is facing two felony fifth-degree drug possession of not a small amount; misdemeanor possession of a synthetic cannabinoid; misdemeanor fourth-degree DWI - operate motor vehicle under the influence of a controlled substance; and petty misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia.

The charges stem from a Feb. 1 traffic stop by a Nobles County Sheriff’s deputy after witnessing Depyper weaving on Interstate 90.

According to the criminal complaint, upon contact, the deputy immediately observed a green leafy substance on the floor of Depyper’s car and three marijuana cigarettes in the ashtray. The deputy also smelled a marijuana and methamphetamine odor coming from the vehicle and detailed how Depyper exhibited behavior consistent with someone that had recently used a controlled substance.

The deputy allegedly discovered various drug paraphernalia in the passenger compartment of the vehicle and .6 grams of a crystalline substance that field tested positive for methamphetamine, the complaint states.

ADVERTISEMENT

In a post-arrest interview, Depyper said she had not smoked meth in eight years but that she had received some that day.

If convicted one of the felony-level charges, Depyper faces a maximum sentence of five years imprisonment, a $10,000 fine or both. Her bail was set at $1,500 with conditions of $15,000 without.

Her initial appearance in Nobles County District Court is scheduled for Feb. 13.

What To Read Next
Fundraising is underway to move the giant ball of twine from the Highland, Wisconsin, home of creator James Frank Kotera, who died last month at age 75, 44 years after starting the big ball.
“We see that when things happen in the coastal areas, a few years later, they start trending toward the Midwest,” said Rep. Ben Krohmer, serving his first term in the House.
“This is sensationalism at its finest, and it does not deserve to be heard in our state capitol,” Rep. Erin Healy, a Democrat and one of 10 votes against the bill in the 70-person chamber, said.
“Let’s put this in the rearview mirror,” Sen. Michael Diedrich, a Rapid City Republican said.