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Glenn Frey, Eagles guitarist, dies at 67

LOS ANGELES -- Glenn Frey, a founding member and guitarist for the Eagles, died Monday. He was 67."It is with the heaviest of hearts that we announce the passing of our comrade, Eagles founder, Glenn Frey, in New York City on Monday, January 18th...

LOS ANGELES - Glenn Frey, a founding member and guitarist for the Eagles, died Monday. He was 67.
“It is with the heaviest of hearts that we announce the passing of our comrade, Eagles founder, Glenn Frey, in New York City on Monday, January 18th, 2016,” the band said in a statement.
“Glenn fought a courageous battle for the past several weeks but, sadly, succumbed to complications from Rheumatoid Arthritis, Acute Ulcerative Colitis and Pneumonia. The Frey family would like to thank everyone who joined Glenn to fight this fight and hoped and prayed for his recovery. Words can neither describe our sorrow, nor our love and respect for all that he has given to us, his family, the music community & millions of fans worldwide.”
Frey wrote and provided vocals for many Eagles hits, including “Heartache Tonight,” “Lyin’ Eyes,” “Tequila Sunrise” and “Take It Easy.”
The musician, with Don Henley, also co-wrote “Hotel California” and “Desperado.” Eagles won six Grammys and five American Music Awards during its run, and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998.
Frey also had a successful solo career after Eagles broke up in 1980. His debut solo album, 1982’s “No Fun Aloud,” contained such Top 40 hits as “The One You Love,” “Smuggler’s Blue,” “Sexy Girl,” “The Heat Is On,” “You Belong to the City,” “True Love,” “Soul Searchin’,” and “Livin’ Right.”
He had an acting career as well, landing a role in the first season of “Miami Vice.”

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