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Glitch in 2018 bonding bill is passed

ST. PAUL -- The Minnesota Senate passed legislation Monday that fixes a small technical glitch in the 2018 bonding bill that potentially could have delayed several important area public works projects. The bill, which passed with wide, bipartisan...

ST. PAUL - The Minnesota Senate passed legislation Monday that fixes a small technical glitch in the 2018 bonding bill that potentially could have delayed several important area public works projects. The bill, which passed with wide, bipartisan support, was signed into law Tuesday morning by Gov. Tim Walz.

“We can now proceed with certainty on the important area projects funded in the bonding bill,” said District 22 Sen. Bill Weber, R-Luverne. “Passing these needed fixes was a true bipartisan effort and marks a big step forward. The projects - from wastewater treatment to highway expansion - affect thousands of southwestern Minnesota residents each and every day. It’s about time the legislature came to agreement and got this done.”

The legislation addresses a small technicality in the bonding bill signed into law last year, which could have prevented certain projects from moving forward. Several area projects included in last year’s bonding bill are enabled to receive funding by this legislation, including wastewater treatment facility upgrades in Mountain Lake and Lakefield, as well as sewer upgrades in Trosky. While the legislation does not specifically name these projects, they are in line to receive funding through the Public Facilities Authority’s Point Source Implementation Grant program and the Water Infrastructure Funding program.

“The technical glitch came to a head when certain environmental groups sued the state over how certain bonds can be used,” Weber said. “Some people seem more interested in studying problems than solving them - but after a lengthy delay, I’m looking forward to seeing these projects move forward.”

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