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‘If the Shoe Fits’ set to take the stage

WORTHINGTON -- Delores may be lucky in love, but unlucky in carrying out a plan to do away with doting husband, Marvin, in the comedic plot of "If the Shoe Fits," a production slated to take the Village Hall stage next week at Pioneer Village in ...

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Josh Radke (left), Nick Fenske and Amanda Solheim are among the cast of "If the Shoe Fits," a production of the Grassroots Community Theater, to take the stage Thursday through Saturday at Pioneer Village. Missing from the cast photo is Marlene Jueneman. (Julie Buntjer/Daily Globe)

WORTHINGTON -- Delores may be lucky in love, but unlucky in carrying out a plan to do away with doting husband, Marvin, in the comedic plot of “If the Shoe Fits,” a production slated to take the Village Hall stage next week at Pioneer Village in Worthington.

Performed by the local Grassroots Community Theater, the cast of four features longtime grassroots theater member Marlene Jueneman of Worthington as Esperanza the Spanish maid, and a trio of relative newcomers -- Josh Radke of Brewster as George the shoe salesman, Nick Fenske of Worthington as Marvin and Amanda Solheim of Worthington as Delores. They are directed by Mary Jane Mardesen.

“This is a funny, funny, funny, funny play,” Mardesen said as cast members prepared for rehearsal Thursday night. “When I read plays, I like it if I burst into giggles, and with this one I did that.”

The play begins with Delores and her husband, Marvin, sharing a meal with shoe salesman George. Delores, who likes shoes -- and buys a lot of them -- has fallen in love with George. There’s just one problem -- her husband.

So, Delores and George hatch a plan to murder Marvin.

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“Of course, the husband isn’t a dumb man, but by hook or by crook, he’s … lucky enough to throw a monkey wrench into every way they can think of to kill him,” Mardesen explained. “He’s just lucky. That’s a central part of the play.”

As the antics ensue, the Spanish maid provides a lot of comic relief in the play.

“Esperanza does a lot of laundry and she dumps it in the room and doesn’t put it away,” said Mardesen, offering a tease that there is a plot twist that will surprise attendees.

Grassroots Community Theater began in Worthington more than 60 years ago. For the past six years, they have performed on the Village Hall stage at Pioneer Village.

“It’s a really tiny space,” Mardesen said. “It’s another reason I tend to look for plays that have only four or five characters.”

Radke did improv during the Elks interactive theater production last year, but hadn’t been on stage since elementary school.

“It’s always fun getting out of your comfort zone,” Radke said of joining the Grassroots Community Theater cast. “You can’t always do the same thing in life.”

Fenske is returning for his second year with the theater, and said portraying Marvin is fun because he gets to speak a little German and use sarcasm.

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“I’ve always loved acting,” added Solheim. This is her first appearance in a Grassroots Community Theater performance.

Grassroots Community Theater performs “If the Shoe Fits” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday, as well as 10 a.m. Saturday, inside the Village Hall at Pioneer Village. The Saturday performance will include coffee and rolls for guests thanks to donors Hy-Vee and Fareway. Seating is limited to 100 people.

Tickets for any of the three performances may be purchased in advance at Hy-Vee or Fareway, and will also be available at the door.


Julie Buntjer became editor of The Globe in July 2021, after working as a beat reporter at the Worthington newspaper since December 2003. She has a bachelor's degree in agriculture journalism from South Dakota State University.
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