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Juror compensations increase Monday

ST. PAUL -- Beginning Monday, the Minnesota Judicial Branch will double the per diem and mileage reimbursement paid to jurors serving in the state's district courts.

ST. PAUL -- Beginning Monday, the Minnesota Judicial Branch will double the per diem and mileage reimbursement paid to jurors serving in the state’s district courts.

Jurors will be paid $20 for each day they report to the courthouse and will be reimbursed for the roundtrip mileage between their home and the courthouse at the rate of 54 cents per mile. Currently, jurors in Minnesota courts are paid $10 per day and are reimbursed for mileage at the rate of 27 cents per mile.

The increase in juror per diem and mileage reimbursement is the result of new funding approved during the 2016 Legislative Session. The Minnesota Judicial Branch sought the funding increase as part of its supplemental budget request, and Gov. Mark Dayton included the request in his supplemental budget recommendations. The Legislature approved the new funding -- $1.5 million annually -- as part of the omnibus supplemental budget bill that was signed into law on June 1.

In addition to per diem and mileage reimbursement, jurors who are normally caring for their children during the day can be reimbursed for childcare expenses during their service, up to $50 per day per family.

In 2015, more than 44,000 Minnesota citizens reported for jury duty in the state’s district courts.

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More information about jury service in Minnesota can be found at www.mncourts.gov/jury .

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