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KTD medallion found: Larson boys to split $100 in Worthington Chamber Bucks

WORTHINGTON -- Little more than 24 hours after the first King Turkey Day Medallion Hunt clue was announced, brothers Dalton and Dominic Larson and their mother Jessica found the bronze-colored coin resting within the leaves of perennial plants be...

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King Turkey Day President Wade Roesner (left) presents Jessica Larson with $100 in Worthington Chamber checks as her sons, Dalton and Dominic, hold the KTD medallion they found Tuesday morning. (Julie Buntjer/Daily Globe)

WORTHINGTON -- Little more than 24 hours after the first King Turkey Day Medallion Hunt clue was announced, brothers Dalton and Dominic Larson and their mother Jessica found the bronze-colored coin resting within the leaves of perennial plants before school Tuesday morning.

Taking a cue from her husband, Jesse, Jessica took the boys to the corner of 10th Street and Third Avenue shortly before 7 a.m. Tuesday to search for the medallion in hopes of claiming the $100 prize.

Six-year-old Dominic and 9-year-old Dalton, however, were a little distracted by a monarch butterfly resting on one of the brick pillars. As they watched the butterfly, their mother happened to see the medallion hidden in the greenery. After pointing the boys in the right direction, it’s uncertain who saw it first.

“Then I took it,” Dominic said proudly.

The boys have decided they will split the winnings 50-50.

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“We’re not sharing with our dad or our mom,” Dalton said. “We’re just having it all to ourselves.”

The two talked about spending their winnings on a big football game or Nerf guns. Who gets to keep the coin? Well, that’s another matter. Dominic said he wanted to put it in the attic so he can keep an eye on it.

Jessica has taken the boys out to search for the medallion for the past few years -- since Dalton was in kindergarten or first grade -- but this is the first time they’ve had success, and it was the first day of their search. After reading Monday’s clue, they decided to wait for Tuesday’s clue to give them a better idea of where to search.

With Jesse honing in on the word “square” in Tuesday’s clue, he got the boys up and ready, and Jessica took them downtown. They focused on the area around the pillars with the “W” at the Third Avenue intersection because that’s the location of the King Turkey Day 10K race finish line.

“We left the house about five (minutes) to seven,” Jessica said, adding that they had about half an hour before she had to take the boys to school and go to her job as a paraprofessional at Worthington Middle School.

As it turned out, they only needed a few minutes to find the medallion. They are already planning to participate in the medallion hunt again next year.

Here are all of the clues that were scheduled to be published for the medallion hunt:

Clue #1 (Monday)

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Paycheck for President in November

But the first big race is in September

Before he can cross the finish line

There's something hidden you must find!

Clue #2 (Tuesday)

A golden medallion is hiding somewhere

Go look, join the fun, don't be a square!

Remember the theme for this year's event,

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If you miss it, you'll have a whole year to lament!

Clue #3 (Wednesday)

When Paycheck is elected they'll tally the votes

While assessing the clues, be sure you take notes!

Decipher the clues, sit down with a friend,

A letter is something that I'd recommend.

Clue #4 (Thursday)

Community leaders will run for election

And maybe chase Paycheck for race's inspection

The handlers hope that their turkey won't fly

Wave and call out when our bird runs by

Clue #5 (Friday)

Pillars of the community need not be tall,

You never know who will answer the call.

When Paycheck runs by this spot we all cheer,

At the base of this pillar the coin is near.


Julie Buntjer became editor of The Globe in July 2021, after working as a beat reporter at the Worthington newspaper since December 2003. She has a bachelor's degree in agriculture journalism from South Dakota State University.
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