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FSA County Committee elections are now open

Producers must participate or cooperate in an FSA program to be eligible to vote in the county committee election.

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ST. PAUL — The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) began mailing ballots last week for the Farm Service Agency (FSA) county and urban county committee elections to eligible agricultural producers and private landowners. Producers and landowners must return ballots to their local FSA county office or have their ballots be postmarked by Dec. 5, 2022 to be counted.   

“County committees provide an opportunity for producers to play a meaningful role in delivering farm programs, but in order for county committees to be effective, they must truly represent all who are producing,” said Whitney Place, FSA State Executive Director. “Voting in these elections is your opportunity to help ensure our county committees in Minnesota reflect the diversity of our agriculture. Your voice and vote matter, don’t miss your chance to cast your ballot.” 

Producers must participate or cooperate in an FSA program to be eligible to vote in the county committee election. A cooperating producer is someone who has provided information about their farming or ranching operation but may not have applied or received FSA program benefits. Additionally, producers who are not of legal voting age but supervise and conduct farming operations for an entire farm are eligible to vote in these elections.  

Producers can find out if their LAA is up for election and if they are eligible to vote by contacting their local FSA county office. Eligible voters who do not receive a ballot in the mail can request one from their local FSA county office.

Related Topics: AGRICULTUREFARMING
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