ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Globe 150th: Beginning a new era in a new location

Today, as we start a new era in our new building and home at 416 10th St., I look forward to continuing to build lifelong relationships, friendships and memories in this community for years to come.

Joni Harms
Joni Harms
We are part of The Trust Project.

Who would have ever thought I would spend my entire professional career in the newspaper industry? All I was seeking out in Worthington, at what was then called the Worthington Daily Globe, was my 3-month internship to complete my accounting degree. As the saying goes, you get ink in your blood and cannot leave.

I was fortunate to be interviewed and hired by Jim Vance and Owen Van Essen back in June of 1978. I worked closely with employees Aileen Watson, Jo Madison and Eleanor Griffith. It was a different world back then, as the presses began humming around noon Monday through Saturday. The smell of the ink and the excitement of seeing what made the front page news for the day is a memory I’ll never forget.

Plus, there was the noise and somewhat chaotic flurry that followed from all of the carrier boys and girls who came to pick up their bundles of papers for the afternoon delivery.

Leading up to the print deadline was the hustle and bustle of the newsroom, which was led by Ray Crippen. He and his staff physically ran in and out of the building to get the scoop of the latest news. I was extremely intimidated by these “larger than life” editorial professionals who were passionate — sometimes to a fault.

Thinking back on my 44 years with The Globe, I was so lucky to have worked with such wonderful people who were willing to take a chance on me, ultimately leading to my current role as publisher since 2006.

ADVERTISEMENT

I want to acknowledge the publishers I worked for and gained leadership knowledge from over the years, including Jim Vance, Dennis Waller, Louie Seesz, Reg Durant, Ron Lindsay and Dennis Hall. Every one of these gentlemen were leading the pack from our historic building at 300 11th St., which was built by the Vance family. The Vances sold the newspaper business to Midwest Newspapers, who sold it to Thomson Newspapers, who sold to our current owner, Forum Communications Company.

Bill Marcil, Sr. once told me he was very excited to bring the Globe back to a family-operated newspaper like it was during the Vance years, and we are grateful they did!

Today, as we start a new era in our new building and home at 416 10th St., I look forward to continuing to build lifelong relationships, friendships and memories in this community for years to come.

I feel fortunate to be surrounded by an amazing team, led by managers Jessica Pass, Roberta Fultz and Julie Buntjer. These very special people, along with all of our Globe employees, have the same drive and passion to inform and connect with our communities just like their predecessors.

To all of the hundreds of employees, too numerous to mention, who have worked for the Globe over the years, thank you for being a part of this history. The memories of potlucks, Christmas parties, break room chats and parades will be forever ingrained in our hearts and minds.

And, thank you to the community for your continued support and recognition of the importance of solid journalism. We wouldn’t be here without you.

Happy 150th Anniversary to The Globe — it’s been so special to be a small part of the ride.

What to read next
The designation also includes the contiguous counties of Jackson, Murray, Nobles, Redwood, Brown and Watonwan.
Grant funding coming to Worthington, Pipestone.
Matthew 25 reminds us that we encounter Christ in the neighbors around us, especially people who are experiencing needs.
Holiday expectations of unalloyed happiness can be pretty unrealistic.