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Halloween fear and fun return to Worthington with the Building of Terror haunted house experience

“We encourage people to come out, enjoy the evening or weekend. It’s a great event,” Maria said. “All the proceeds will go back to the community.”

What horrors await in the Building of Terror this year?
What horrors await in the Building of Terror this year?
Submitted photo
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WORTHINGTON — The titans of torment have returned to Worthington for the Halloween season, and Mark and Maria Thier are bringing the Building of Terror haunted house experience with them once more.

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“We’re excited,” Maria said. “We’ve had calls to do it again.”

“Our kids are more pushy than anyone,” Mark added.

The Building of Terror, located at 628 10th Avenue, will be open from 7 to 11 p.m. Oct. 28 and 29. It costs $5 to get in, regardless of a person’s age, and while all ages are welcome to participate in the no-contact haunted house, those younger than 10 should be accompanied by an adult. Costumes for attendees are discouraged.

Maria recommended that parents use discretion to determine whether a child should attend or not.

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Typically, people are put into groups of eight, who are shepherded through the building with a guide. There will be a safeword for visitors who become overwhelmed and can’t continue, so that another volunteer can escort them out to meet their party at the end of the experience.

“We encourage people to come out, enjoy the evening or weekend. It’s a great event,” Maria said. “All the proceeds will go back to the community.”

The Building of Terror haunted house returns to Worthington this year, with its ghoulies and ghosties and long-leggedy beasties and things that go bump in the night.
The Building of Terror haunted house returns to Worthington this year, with its ghoulies and ghosties and long-leggedy beasties and things that go bump in the night.
Submitted photo

The Thiers started the Building of Terror as a fundraiser when their daughters’ cross country team needed a few things, and a group of parents and runners came together for the project. While COVID-19 put the haunting on pause for a bit, the Thiers are happy to bring it back this year for the third time. It will still be a fundraiser for some community, extracurricular or school-related area, though they haven’t decided yet where donations will go this time.

Every year, it takes about 15 to 20 volunteers to bring the Building of Terror up to its most horrifying potential, from actors to parking lot attendants. The Thiers start physically building it out at the beginning of October but plan all year long.

“I’m not even a haunted house person,” Maria said.

Mark and Maria Thier are looking forward to their upcoming Building of Terror, a haunted house experience open to all.
Mark and Maria Thier are looking forward to their upcoming Building of Terror, a haunted house experience open to all.
Kari Lucin / The Globe

In previous years, about 1,000 people have made their way through the Building of Terror between the two nights, and community response has been tremendously positive, as it gives people something fun to do in Worthington, Maria said.

Mark and Maria were hesitant to discuss their plans for the annual nightmare-fest, as they don’t want to spoil it for visitors.

“Even the actors don’t get to know about it until the day before, to keep it very under wraps,” Maria said. “Our own children have been trained not to share information.”

Related Topics: WORTHINGTONEVENTS
A 1999 graduate of Jackson County Central and a 2003 graduate of Augsburg College, Kari Lucin started writing for newspapers in Minnesota and North Dakota in 2006. During her time as a reporter, she covered beats including education, watershed, county and agriculture, and frequently wrote about health and science. She has also served as an online content coordinator and an engagement specialist at various Forum Communications properties. She was a marketing assistant at Iowa Lakes Community College in Estherville for two years, where she did design work in addition to writing and social media management.

Lucin is currently a community editor with the Globe of Worthington.

Email: klucin@dglobe.com
Phone: (507) 376-7319
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