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Vandals damage property at Pioneer Village

"It's all very unfortunate," said NCHS Executive Director, Beth Rickers Namanny.

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Pioneer Village
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WORTHINGTON — Vandals broke windows and doors to several buildings at Pioneer Village in Worthington over the weekend, and now the site will likely be closed for the remainder of the season.

The damage was discovered Saturday evening.

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According to Beth Rickers Namanny, executive director of the Nobles County Historical Society, the damage occurred after an event hosted at the Pioneer Village.
“Some kids went and broke a whole bunch of windows and broke down doors and caused a whole lot of damage,” she said, noting that two kids were apprehended, but others were likely involved.

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Doors and windows at Pioneer village were reportedly battered by a group of young vandals on Saturday, August 13.

Damage was done to multiple buildings, including the Depot and farmhouse, with a variety of items the perpetrators appeared to have found on the property, such as a pick ax and mallet.

While no one had been out to assess the damage yet, Namanny estimated there was probably several thousand dollars worth of damage done.

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Windows and doors have been boarded up to prevent further damage from the elements at this point.

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Pioneer Village will likely be closed for the remainder of the season, due to the damage.

A police report was filed and anyone with additional information is encouraged to contact the Worthington Police Department.

“They did a lot more than just physical damage and I feel terrible for this family that had this (event) ruined,” Namanny said. “It’s all very unfortunate.”

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Emma McNamee joined The Globe team in October 2021 as a reporter covering Crime & Courts, Politics, and the City beats. Born and raised in Duluth, Minn., McNamee left her hometown to attend school in Chicago at Columbia College. She graduated in 2021 with a degree in Multimedia Journalism, with a concentration in News & Feature Writing and a minor in Creative Writing.
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