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Mattress recycling program to start next spring in Nobles County

WORTHINGTON -- Nobles County residents will soon be able to recycle their used mattresses at less than half the cost they currently pay. At the same time, they'll help keep the large, bulky items from filling up the local landfill.

WORTHINGTON - Nobles County residents will soon be able to recycle their used mattresses at less than half the cost they currently pay. At the same time, they’ll help keep the large, bulky items from filling up the local landfill.

During a work session of the county’s board of commissioners on Wednesday, Schaap Sanitation District Manager Eric Joens and Nobles County Environmental Services Manager Mark Koster explained the program, which they hope to start around April 1.

Two drop-off sites are planned in the county - one at the Schaap Sanitation site along Minnesota 60 south of Worthington and the other at the county landfill. In addition, roll-off containers will be parked in communities throughout the county for half a day during the spring clean-up events.

The mattresses must be clean - not heavily soiled or wet - and will cost individuals $10 each to recycle, a reduction from the $22 currently charged.

Once a load is filled, the mattresses will be hauled by Schaap’s to a recycling facility in Lyon County, where they will be dismantled and separated into piles of wire, foam, wood and cotton.

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“They can recycle about 89 percent of the material,” Koster said.

The new program will boost the county’s recycling percentage, added Joens.

The cost to the county has yet to be determined, and will be included in the new contract between Nobles County and Schaap Sanitation.

Also on Wednesday, commissioners received an update from Shawn Nelson of the Southwest Minnesota Housing Partnership regarding the ongoing capital improvement plan projects.

Nelson said a temporary roof was installed on the Prairie Justice Center garage and crews are getting ready to pour the concrete floor in the building. Another crew is finishing up the final work on the PJC roof.

The steel sheeting on the Adrian shop is going up this week, and workers will then begin working on the roof.

“There’s a lot of little clean-up work yet on all the projects,” County Administrator Tom Johnson added.

The new roof for the public works building in Worthington will be delayed until after a new boiler is installed in the building next spring. Gag Sheet Metal will complete that project when it is in town for the PJC garage roofing project.

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A new air handler planned in the Government Center will be installed next fall.

In other business:

  • Commissioner Matt Widboom provided an update on the proposed paving of the fairgrounds road, extending from Stower Drive north to the commercial building.

Some of the survey work and elevation data has been completed, and Public Works Director Stephen Schnieder will develop a cost estimate for the project as part of the county’s in-kind contribution. It’s hoped that the estimate will be completed by the end of January. The Nobles County Fair Association plans to secure a loan for the paving.

  • Discussed a potential timeline for a public hearing with the city of Round Lake as the county continues to work with New Fashion Pork on a proposed feed mill in the community. Meanwhile, Johnson said he is working on a business subsidy policy as guidance for the board in the future.
Julie Buntjer became editor of The Globe in July 2021, after working as a beat reporter at the Worthington newspaper since December 2003. She has a bachelor's degree in agriculture journalism from South Dakota State University.
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