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Memorial funds presented to local 4-H, hockey organizations

WORTHINGTON -- Two chapters within the National Wild Turkey Federation have raised more than $1,400 to support Nobles County 4-H and the Worthington Hockey Association.

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Clyde Scheevel (left) and Al Thiner (right), representing local National Wild Turkey Federation chapters, present Jeff Nickel memorial funds to Nobles County 4-H representatives Linda Loonan, Emmett Bickett and Katie Klosterbuer, as well as Worthington Hockey Association President Scott Langerud. (Tim Middagh / The Globe)

WORTHINGTON - Two chapters within the National Wild Turkey Federation have raised more than $1,400 to support Nobles County 4-H and the Worthington Hockey Association.

The donations are being given in memory of Worthington businessman Jeff Nickel, who was killed in a hunting accident in September. Both organizations had been identified by the family as places to which memorials could be directed.

The Buffalo Ridge Gobblers chapter at Marshall kicked off the fundraiser on a whim after one of its youth members, Jake Miller, won a gun at the chapter’s recent banquet. Miller told his dad he didn’t need another gun, but asked if he could donate it back as a fundraiser for Spenser Nickel.

According to Al Thiner, of the Tomorrow’s Turkeys chapter in Nobles County, the Marshall event raised $400. A second fundraiser, this one during the Tomorrow’s Turkeys chapter’s annual banquet, began when someone purchased an artist’s print and offered to donate it back as a fundrasier. Through a series of bid bumping, the fundraiser netted another $1,090, for a total collection between the two chapters of $1,490.

Divided equally, checks in the amount of $745 were given each to Nobles County 4-H and the Worthington Hockey Association.

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