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Minneapolis City Hall, federal building temporarily step up security

MINNEAPOLIS -- Increased security at Minneapolis City Hall and a nearby federal building Wednesday was a random action.Robert Sperling of the Federal Protective Service said that for more than a year, the service has "deployed randomly across the...

MINNEAPOLIS - Increased security at Minneapolis City Hall and a nearby federal building Wednesday was a random action.
Robert Sperling of the Federal Protective Service said that for more than a year, the service has “deployed randomly across the country to reinforce the security measures at federal facilities, which includes an increased and visible presence of law enforcement. This is what you are looking at in Minneapolis.”
With terrorism on people’s minds and tensions running high in a Minneapolis police shooting of a young black man, questions arose about whether the security was related to one of those issues.
Minneapolis officials increased security when they learned the federal facility did.
The heightened security included “having security guards at entrances and requiring staff to show employee identification to enter,” city spokesman Casper Hill said. “We were advised that the federal building imposed additional security measures, and best practices require City Hall to follow suit.”
City Hall security returned to normal by 10:30 a.m.
A Hennepin County sheriff’s office news release said that officials there are “not aware of any concerns that would warrant closing City Hall.”
The city facility closed early Tuesday afternoon as nearly 1,000 protesters of the Jamar Clark shooting at the hands of Minneapolis police marched to city hall.

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