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Fire at hobby farm in southern Minnesota kills more than a dozen animals

A fire destroyed a shed used to house animals, including calves, pigs and chickens, Thursday afternoon, Feb. 24, 2022.

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BYRON — More than a dozen animals were killed Thursday, Feb. 24, 2022, when a fire broke out in a shed on a Kalmar Township hobby farm.

A passerby called law enforcement after spotting a shed on fire in the 9200 block of Town Hall Road Northwest in Byron. Olmsted County Sheriff's deputies arrived to find the 20- by 30-foot shed fully engulfed in flames, according to Lt. Lee Rossman. The Byron Fire Department was called to put out the fire.

The shed was a total loss. Nineteen animals were killed in the fire, including four calves, nine pigs and six chickens, Rossman said.

Initial reports indicate that the fire was not suspicious. The owner told deputies that some heaters were running inside the shed.

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Emily Cutts is the Post Bulletin's public safety reporter. She joined the Post Bulletin in July 2018 after stints in Vermont and Western Massachusetts.
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