ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Minnesota Supreme Court rules state senator meets residency requirements

The court backed a court-appointed referee who determined state Sen. Torrey Westrom, R-Alexandria, lives within the boundaries of the new Senate District 12 and meets the residency requirements for the 2022 general election.

Minnesota state Sen. Torrey Westrom has served in the Senate since 2013.
Minnesota state Sen. Torrey Westrom has served in the Senate since 2013.
Echo Press file photo
We are part of The Trust Project.

ST. PAUL — The Minnesota Supreme Court backed a court-appointed referee who determined state Sen. Torrey Westrom, R-Alexandria, lives within the boundaries of the new Senate District 12 and meets the residency requirements for the 2022 general election.

The court made the decision on Tuesday, Sept. 27.

“I’m glad to finally have this frivolous attempt to disqualify me concluded by the Minnesota Supreme Court,” Westrom said in a statement. “Their decision ends a coordinated effort by the DFL, and independent candidates to try to have me removed from the ballot.”

On Aug. 8, Ashley Klingbeil of Alexandria, an independent candidate running for the District 12 Senate seat, and her campaign manager, filed a petition with the Minnesota Supreme Court, asking the court to remove Westrom’s name from the Nov. 8 ballot. They alleged that Westrom had not established his residency in the district by May 8, the required six months from the general election.

After redistricting, Senate District 12 comprises portions of Douglas and Stearns and all of Big Stone, Pope, Stevens and Swift counties. Klingbeil’s petition claimed that Westrom was still living in Elbow Lake, which is not in Senate District 12.

ADVERTISEMENT

After the referee judge ruled in favor of Westrom on Aug. 31, Klingbeil said that while she disagreed that Westrom met the residency requirement, she respected the court's decision that the petition did not meet the burden of proof.

The Supreme Court rejected all the petitioners’ objections, stating, “We conclude that these objections fail.” The Supreme Court made the final decision based on the lower court’s findings and additional scrutiny.

Three candidates are vying for the Minnesota Senate District 12 office — Westrom, Klingbeil, who listed her party affiliation as "We the People," and Kari Dorry, the DFL-endorsed candidate from Ortonville.

“We are in the throes of an important struggle in this country,” McLemore said to students, faculty, and community members Tuesday. “...This battle is around the right to vote.”
New Worthington Mayor Rick Von Holdt and council members Alaina Kolpin and Larry Janssen participated in a swearing-in ceremony at Worthington City Hall on Jan. 4, 2023
The election, strikes and the abortion debate made headlines in Minnesota this year.
After passing with 56% of the vote, offering Medicaid benefits to an expanded population is now a part of the state constitution. Here's what state officials have to do to meet the July 1 deadline.

Al Edenloff is the editor of the twice-weekly Echo Press. He started his journalism career when he was in 10th grade, writing football and basketball stories for the Parkers Prairie Independent.
What To Read Next
The “Driver’s Licenses For All” bill would remove the requirement for license applicants to provide proof of citizenship or lawful presence.
Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison repeated his concern that the planned March 31 merger date is "too ambitious."
In a letter to state officials, the company said the closure would be permanent, but did not explain its decision to the state
Musher Joanna Oberg of Grand Marais and her team of dogs finished the 107.5-mile mid-distance race in 15 hours, 5 minutes and 15 seconds.