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Twin Cities couple claims $67M in first-ever Mega Millions jackpot won in Minnesota

Although the prize was valued at $110 million if taken as an annuity, the winners chose the cash option worth $66.9 million.

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ST. PAUL -- A suburban Twin Cities couple has come forward to claim the April 12 Mega Millions jackpot worth nearly $67 million.

The anonymous man and woman, who reside in Ramsey, are the first Minnesotans to win the jackpot since the state began participating in the Mega Millions game in 2010, according to a news release issued Wednesday by Minnesota Lottery officials.

Although the prize was valued at $110 million if taken as an annuity, the winners chose the cash option worth $66.9 million.

The couple, who elected not to publicly identify themselves under a law passed last year by the Minnesota Legislature that allows lottery winners to remain anonymous, bought the winning ticket at a Holiday gas station on Xkimo Street. The prize is the largest claimed so far under the new law.

“To help navigate their new life as lottery winners, they took time to assemble a team that includes a lawyer, financial advisor and an accountant before they claimed the prize,” Minnesota Lottery officials explained in the news release. “They said that their immediate plans are ‘typical.’ They would like to purchase a house and a car, and travel.”

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The Holiday station where the winning ticket was sold was awarded a $50,000 “bonus” payment from the Minnesota Lottery.

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