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MnDOT adopts new mowing/hay baling standard and permit

ST. PAUL -- The Minnesota Department of Transportation urges those who want to mow and or bale hay on state right of way -- land along Minnesota's state roadways -- to put in their permit applications early next year. MnDOT recently adopted a sta...

ST. PAUL - The Minnesota Department of Transportation urges those who want to mow and or bale hay on state right of way - land along Minnesota’s state roadways - to put in their permit applications early next year.
MnDOT recently adopted a statewide standard for mowing and baling in the right of way and has developed a new permit form. State law requires MnDOT manage right of way mowing, which includes cutting in advance of baling. And, by state law, it is a misdemeanor to mow on state highway right of way without a permit.

The new permit provides information on when and where mowing and baling can occur, safety measures required and how long baled hay can be left in the right of way. Large round hay bales are heavy and can be a significant hazard to vehicles that might run into the ditch.
Landowners who want to mow on right of way adjacent to their property need to apply for a permit before the end of January. On Feb. 1, all others may apply for permits to mow on state right of way. MnDOT will accept, review and approve permits on a first-come, first-serve basis.
The new permit can be found at mndot.gov/mowing.

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