ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

MnDOT offers Local Road Improvement Program funding

ST. PAUL -- Minnesota cities, counties and townships can apply for funding support for transportation infrastructure projects on local roads as part of the Minnesota Department of Transportation's Local Road Improvement Program.

ST. PAUL - Minnesota cities, counties and townships can apply for funding support for transportation infrastructure projects on local roads as part of the Minnesota Department of Transportation’s Local Road Improvement Program.

Approximately $25.3 million in bond funds is available for constructing or reconstructing local roads in 2018, 2019 or 2020. Funding may be requested for projects that will reduce traffic crashes on rural County State Aid Highways, for projects on local roads with regional significance or for the local share of a trunk highway project.


Types of projects previously funded include roundabouts, pavement reconstruction, curve and roadway alignment, pavement resurfacing and reconditioning, and safety improvements such as turn lanes, traffic signals and rural intersection warning systems.

The deadline for counties and state aid cities (population greater than 5,000) is Nov. 3, and Dec. 1 for non-state aid cities and townships.

The application and more information is available online at dot.state.mn.us/stateaid/lrip. Applications may be submitted electronically at saltirhelp.dot@state.mn.us . Questions about the solicitation may be directed to Patti Loken at 651-366-3803 or Patti.Loken@state.mn.us .

What To Read Next
“Why would we create new major programs, when we can’t even fund the programs that we have?” a public education lobbyist said in opposition to Noem's three-year, $15 million proposal.
The North Dakota Highway Patrol investigated the Wednesday, Jan. 25, crash.
Fundraising is underway to move the giant ball of twine from the Highland, Wisconsin, home of creator James Frank Kotera, who died last month at age 75, 44 years after starting the big ball.
“We see that when things happen in the coastal areas, a few years later, they start trending toward the Midwest,” said Rep. Ben Krohmer, serving his first term in the House.