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MnDOT seeks Adopt a Highway volunteers

ST. PAUL -- The Minnesota Department of Transportation is looking for individuals and organizations to join the more than 4,500 groups and 45,000 people in the state who are Adopt a Highway volunteers.The program is a public service project that ...

ST. PAUL - The Minnesota Department of Transportation is looking for individuals and organizations to join the more than 4,500 groups and 45,000 people in the state who are Adopt a Highway volunteers.
The program is a public service project that helps reduce litter along the roadsides. It’s been part of MnDOT’s maintenance operations for many years

In the Mankato and Windom areas, there are 68 sections unadopted, including along Minnesota 23 in Rock County and along I-90 in southwest Minnesota.

“Volunteers pick up litter, keep the roadways beautiful and save taxpayers money,” said Ernest Lloyd, statewide Adopt a Highway manager. “When our volunteers are out cleaning the roadway ditches, MnDOT employees use their time to maintain our highways. It’s a win-win for the state, and it shows that Minnesotans care about their state.”


To volunteer, visit mndot.gov/adopt/ to find local area program coordinators. MnDOT provides safety training, trash bags and safety vests, and will pick up the filled bags. MnDOT also posts signs along the adopted segments of roads with the names of the volunteer groups.

Volunteers are asked to commit to the program for at least two years and pick up litter on both sides of the roadway at least twice a year. The average length of an adopted roadway is two to three miles, although some roads are longer.

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