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Mother claims innocence in cannabis case

MADISON -- An attorney filed motions in district court Wednesday seeking to dismiss a charge of child endangerment against Angela Brown, who has used medical cannabis to treat her son.

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MADISON - An attorney filed motions in district court Wednesday seeking to dismiss a charge of child endangerment against Angela Brown, who has used medical cannabis to treat her son.

Immediately after the hearing, Brown, 38, of Madison, and attorney Michael Hughes of Bend, Ore., gathered with reporters at the Pantry Café in downtown Madison and said they are prepared to go to trial to maintain her innocence.
Her case has drawn state and national attention to the small town in west-central Minnesota. Brown used of medical cannabis to treat her son Trey, 15, who suffers from a traumatic brain injury.
“How is endangering your child taking his pain away?’’ Brown said. “If someone answers that for me, fine, charge me, but until someone can explain to me how preventing pain is wrong, then I will continue to plead not guilty.’’
Lac qui Parle County filed two gross misdemeanor charges in June of endangering a child - permitting to be present when possessing a controlled substance and contribute to the need for child protection or services. The charges came after Brown had been asked at the Lac qui Parle Valley Schools what she was doing differently to account for her son’s improved performance.

Related Topics: MADISON
Tom Cherveny is a regional and outdoors reporter for the West Central Tribune.
He has been a reporter with the West Central Tribune since 1993.

Cherveny can be reached via email at tcherveny@wctrib.com or by phone at 320-214-4335.
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