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MSP apprehends Nevada man after marijuana discovery

WORTHINGTON -- A Nevada man was arrested Wednesday near Worthington after approximately 130 pounds of marijuana were allegedly discovered in his vehicle.

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Luong

WORTHINGTON -- A Nevada man was arrested Wednesday near Worthington after approximately 130 pounds of marijuana were allegedly discovered in his vehicle.

Ike Luong, 56, of Las Vegas, Nev., has been charged with felony first-degree sale of drugs (25 kilograms or more of marijuana) and felony first-degree drug possession of 50 kilograms or more of marijuana (or 500 or more plants) in Nobles County District Court.

According to the criminal complaint, a Minnesota state patrolman was suspicious of the vehicle traveling on Interstate 90 and began to follow it. The patrolman pulled Luong over for unsafe passing.

Due to behavioral indicators, the patrolman believed Luong and his passenger to be involved in criminal activity and asked to search their vehicle. Luong denied, stating the vehicle was not his.

The patrolman retrieved his K-9 partner, who indicated the presence of illegal substances.

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Eight duffle bags containing raw marijuana in an exterior cargo rack and trunk were allegedly discovered. A marijuana wax pen was also recovered. The uncertified weight of the duffle bags was about 130 pounds.

Luong’s passenger has not been charged.

If Luong is convicted of either felony charge, he faces a maximum sentence of 30 years imprisonment and/or a $1 million fine.

Loung’s bail was set at $100,000 with conditions and $250,000 without. His initial appearance in Nobles County District Court is scheduled for Jan. 30.

Related Topics: MINNESOTA STATE PATROL
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