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Next exchange student to Crailsheim selected

WORTHINGTON -- Mariah Hennings will be the next student representative to experience a year in Crailsheim, Germany in a student exchange program that dates back to 1965.

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Liss Huss (left), the current Crailsheim exchange student to Worthington, joins newly selected Worthington exchange student Mariah Hennings. Hennings will leave this summer for a one-year stay in Worthington's sister city, Crailsheim, Germany. (Julie Buntjer / The Globe)

WORTHINGTON - Mariah Hennings will be the next student representative to experience a year in Crailsheim, Germany in a student exchange program that dates back to 1965.

Hennings gasped in excitement as her name was called during Sunday afternoon’s Worthington-Crailsheim International banquet. The Worthington High School sophomore was among two candidates vying for the chance to be the next exchange student to Crailsheim. Abigail Bannor was the second.

Hennings, of Brewster, is the daughter of Lyn Hennings and Rick Hennings. She has two older brothers, Ridge and Kaleb, and one younger brother, Hayden.

Currently enrolled in German I at Worthington High School, Hennings said she applied to be the next exchange student because she wanted to challenge herself, both in school and culturally. She’s never travelled abroad, and is looking forward to the experience.

“My family is in large part German, and I also wanted to challenge myself with learning another language,” she said.

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For the full story, please see Wednesday’s edition of The Globe.

Julie Buntjer became editor of The Globe in July 2021, after working as a beat reporter at the Worthington newspaper since December 2003. She has a bachelor's degree in agriculture journalism from South Dakota State University.
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