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Nobles County Art Center to feature works of Worthington native

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Worthington native Rosie (Meinders) Eylens is the new featured artist at the Nobles County Art Center in Worthington. An opening reception is planned from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday at the center, which is located in the lower level of the War Memorial Building, 407 12th St., Worthington. (Julie Buntjer / The Globe)

WORTHINGTON — Paintings of snow-capped mountains, autumn leaves, florals and abstracts now adorn the walls of the Nobles County Art Center, located in the lower level of the War Memorial building in downtown Worthington.

The images — 38 in all — are the works of Rosie (Meinders) Eylens, a 1961 Worthington High School graduate now living in Larkspur, Colo. Her third show at the local art center opens with a public reception from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday.

While trained in a variety of art mediums — sculpture, pottery, drawing in high school and acrylics, watercolor, encaustic, monotype print and alcohol ink as an adult — Eylens finds the greatest joy in painting with watercolors and alcohol ink these days.

“A lot of inspiration is from photographs that I take,” she said. “I continue to take workshops and art classes because it keeps me inspired.”

Eylens said creating art is a way for her to express her feelings.

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“The beauty of flowers and the ocean and the mountains, it’s one of those things I feel takes your breath away,” she said. “I have an emotional feeling a lot of times when I’m painting my art.

"I just hope that other people feel that same energy of what I try to portray in my art.”

Eylens has found her inspiration in her life experiences. After spending her first 18 1/2 years in the Cherry Point neighborhood in Worthington, she’s moved 28 different times. Though she now enjoys the mountain scenery of Colorado, she’s lived on both coasts — Washington and Florida — and in several Midwestern states. She has used those experiences, as well as her many travels, in her paintings over the years.

“I took an art trip to France and went to Monet’s hometown and painted for three days in his gardens,” she said. “I go to the mountains, I’ve been to Washington, D.C., to photograph cherry blossoms … and we’ll do trips to Moab and the Grand Canyon and get ideas there.”

While in Worthington this week, she visited a local apple orchard and captured photos of pumpkin patches and apple trees that she anticipates will inspire future works of art.

Eylens and her husband have lived at Larkspur for the past 11 years. She has a studio in their home in which she paints eight to 10 hours each week.

With her proximity to Denver, Eylens continues to explore her artistic talent by taking workshops to either improve upon skills she already has or to learn a new art form.

Eylens said her love for art stems back to her childhood days, when she would draw in the back seat of the car while on the way to her grandma’s house.

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“I always designed my own paper dolls’ clothes,” she said. “That would probably be the start — around (age) 7-8-9.”

In high school, she enrolled in art classes led by Sebastian Adler, who was influential in establishing the Nobles County Art Center.

Work and family left little time for Eylens to explore her artwork for about 40 years. As she approached retirement, though, she felt drawn to start creating once again.

“My daughter opened an art gallery and I was always helping her hang the show and work the artist reception,” Eylens said. “After a year and a half, I thought, ‘I bet I could do this.’”

That led to an annual show at the gallery, and then shows at other locales in the greater Denver area. In the last decade, Eylens has hosted three shows at her studio. Those have proven to be the most successful in terms of sales.

All of Eylens' works on display at the Nobles County Art Center are available for purchase. In addition to the many framed prints, she also has a bin of smaller prints and some cards. The show will remain open during the art center’s normal hours through Nov. 6.

091819.N.DG.ARTISTRECEPTION 2.jpg
Worthington native Rosie (Meinders) Eylens is the new featured artist at the Nobles County Art Center in Worthington. An opening reception is planned from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday at the center, which is located in the lower level of the War Memorial Building, 407 12th St., Worthington. (Julie Buntjer / The Globe)

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