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Oberstar remembered at Duluth memorial service

DULUTH -- It's been almost two months since Minnesotans awoke to hear the news that Jim Oberstar died in his sleep. Friday offered "some closure," said one Duluth resident to another as attendees filtered into a ballroom at the Duluth Entertainme...

DULUTH - It’s been almost two months since Minnesotans awoke to hear the news that Jim Oberstar died in his sleep.
Friday offered “some closure,” said one Duluth resident to another as attendees filtered into a ballroom at the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center for the second of three state memorial services honoring the legendary congressman. The final memorial took place later in the day in Oberstar’s hometown of Chisolm.
“The idea of harnessing resources,” Oberstar said during a video presentation that started the service, “was ingrained in me.”
Nobody harnessed resources any better.
“His fingerprints are on every federally funded transportation project in the country,” said U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., one of a host of dignitaries to speak at the event.
Together in their speeches, they took measure of a man who was among the rarest of the rare. He was a great man who accomplished as much while remaining a good man, said Duluth Mayor Don Ness.
Ness recalled being an Oberstar staff member - an “Oberstaffer” - and carting the congressman around in Ness’ Ford Escort. Oberstar regaled a young Ness on policy and lawmaking.
“I was an audience of one,” Ness said. “He loved that I was curious.”

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