ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Repair shop choice is easy

NEW YORK -- Here's advice on how to choose a repair facility from the nonprofit National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE): ? Start shopping for a repair facility before you need one. ? Ask your friends and associates for their re...

NEW YORK -- Here's advice on how to choose a repair facility from the nonprofit National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE):

  • Start shopping for a repair facility before you need one.
  • Ask your friends and associates for their recommendations; consult local consumer groups.
  • Arrange for transportation to the facility in advance so you will not feel forced to choose a shop based on its location.
  • Look for a neat, well-organized facility, with vehicles in the parking lot equal in value to your own and modern equipment in the service bays.
  • Look for a courteous staff, with a service consultant willing to answer all of your questions.
  • Look for policies regarding estimated repair costs, diagnostic fees, guarantees, and acceptable methods of payment.
  • Ask if the repair facility specializes in or if it usually handles your type of repair work.
  • Look for signs of professionalism in the customer service area such as a display of civic, community, or customer service awards.
  • Look for evidence of qualified technicians -- certification by ASE, trade-school diplomas, and certificates of advanced courses.
What To Read Next
Fundraising is underway to move the giant ball of twine from the Highland, Wisconsin, home of creator James Frank Kotera, who died last month at age 75, 44 years after starting the big ball.
“We see that when things happen in the coastal areas, a few years later, they start trending toward the Midwest,” said Rep. Ben Krohmer, serving his first term in the House.
“This is sensationalism at its finest, and it does not deserve to be heard in our state capitol,” Rep. Erin Healy, a Democrat and one of 10 votes against the bill in the 70-person chamber, said.
“Let’s put this in the rearview mirror,” Sen. Michael Diedrich, a Rapid City Republican said.