ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Replacing the belt, not your engine, may be the answer

NEW YORK -- Would you rather replace a belt today or an engine tomorrow? When it comes to servicing your car this spring, would you rather pay out $200 or $2,000? The answers are simple.

NEW YORK -- Would you rather replace a belt today or an engine tomorrow? When it comes to servicing your car this spring, would you rather pay out $200 or $2,000? The answers are simple.

If you own one of the millions of cars that have an interference engine, and the timing belt breaks, you may be buying a new engine for upwards of $2,000, plus a towing charge. On an interference engine, a broken timing belt can cause the pistons to slam into the valves and possibly destroy the engine.

To avoid being stranded and having the expense of a new engine,engineers at Gates Corporation, a worldwide belt and hose manufacturer, stress that it's critical to change a timing belt anywhere from 36,000 to 100,000 miles, with most car manufacturers suggesting around 60,000 miles. The cost for not replacing a failed timing belt, especially on an interference engine, could add up to 10 times the cost of replacing the belt.

What To Read Next
A resolution looking to allow the legislature to consider work requirements on the newly expanded Medicaid program is one step closer to the 2024 ballot.
Navigator CO2 Ventures is hoping to streamline the application process in Illinois as they add an additional pipeline to the mix.
The North Dakota Highway Patrol is investigating the Wednesday, Jan. 25, crash.
Testimony to the top House committee from a convicted attendee of the Jan. 6 rally focused on the "inhumane" treatment of Jan. 6 defendants. The committee rejected a resolution on the matter 12-0.