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Rosenstone to retire as MnSCU chancellor next year

ST. PAUL -- Steven Rosenstone will indeed retire as Minnesota State Colleges and Universities chancellor when his contract expires in July 2017, the higher education system announced Friday.Rosenstone, 64, acknowledged as much in response to an i...

ST. PAUL - Steven Rosenstone will indeed retire as Minnesota State Colleges and Universities chancellor when his contract expires in July 2017, the higher education system announced Friday.
Rosenstone, 64, acknowledged as much in response to an inquiry Monday that he was considering retirement.
Faculty leaders were expecting the announcement in June, but MnSCU made it official with a laudatory news release Friday.
It noted Rosenstone hired 21 of the 30 presidents now working in the higher education system, many of whom are women or people of color.
“Of the accomplishments I am most proud of, nothing exceeds the pride I take in the extraordinary team of leaders I helped recruit to Minnesota State Colleges and Universities and the team we built,” Rosenstone said in the release.
Gov. Mark Dayton said in a statement Friday that Rosenstone has served with “great distinction.”
State Rep. Bud Nornes, R-Fergus Falls, who chairs the House higher education committee, called the chancellor a “fierce advocate” for MnSCU and its communities and students.
Board of Trustees chairman Michael Vekich called Rosenstone a “visionary leader.”
Roger Moe, the former state senate majority leader who helped bring myriad community colleges, technical colleges and state universities together as one entity in 1991, said Rosenstone has advanced the vision lawmakers had two decades ago.
Rosenstone’s central initiative has been to boost collaboration among the campuses, including agreements on joint purchasing and student credit transfer.
Along the way, he’s faced heavy criticism from faculty and student groups for a lack of transparency and other issues. And several colleges and universities now are struggling to adapt to persistent enrollment losses.
Rosenstone was hired in 2011, and his second three-year contract expires July 31, 2017. MnSCU will announce soon how they’ll go about hiring his successor.
He’ll make $390,000 this year plus about $71,600 for housing, transportation, professional development, travel and communication

Related Topics: EDUCATION
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