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Shallow lake enhancement project to begin

WESTBROOK -- A substantial decline in wildlife use and habitat quality on Long Lake in Cottonwood County has prompted the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to begin lowering water levels on the lake, located southeast of Westbrook.Water l...

WESTBROOK - A substantial decline in wildlife use and habitat quality on Long Lake in Cottonwood County has prompted the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to begin lowering water levels on the lake, located southeast of Westbrook.
Water levels will be lowered in Long Lake as far as possible and remain there through the winter to control roughfish and improve wildlife habitat. DNR staff have documented poor habitat conditions as well as common carp and other roughfish in the lake while conducting shallow lake surveys in previous years.
Low water levels this fall will make accessing Long Lake difficult, but the lake should refill naturally in 2018 with snow melt and rainwater runoff.
Work will begin this fall on the construction of a water control structure and fish barrier to allow the DNR to actively manage water levels on the lake and restrict common carp and other undesirable fish species from reentering the basin.
As part of the project, DNR staff will also treat Round Lake, located directly upstream of Long Lake, with rotenone, which is toxic to fish. This will help eliminate undesirable fish species that currently dominate the system. The treatment of Round Lake is scheduled for the third week in October.

Related Topics: ROUND LAKE
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